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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
March 28, 1966
HOLY RULE BOOKSirs:On March 6 we read of two examples of official firmness in sports: Penn was ruled out of the NCAA Basketball Tournament, and Doug Sanders was expelled from the Pensacola Open Golf Tournament. The many objections to such actions are unfounded. Although the players may suffer and the public may be disappointed, how many of us could really enjoy a sports event if we did not know someone was in charge?DONALD C. HAMILTON Bryn Mawr, Pa.
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March 28, 1966

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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HOLY RULE BOOK
Sirs:
On March 6 we read of two examples of official firmness in sports: Penn was ruled out of the NCAA Basketball Tournament, and Doug Sanders was expelled from the Pensacola Open Golf Tournament. The many objections to such actions are unfounded. Although the players may suffer and the public may be disappointed, how many of us could really enjoy a sports event if we did not know someone was in charge?
DONALD C. HAMILTON
Bryn Mawr, Pa.

Sirs:
I was truly surprised and chagrined at your departure from your usual good-humored and incisive piercing of the foibles of some of sports' officialdom in l'affaire Doug Sanders (SCORECARD, March 14).

True, a rule is a rule. However, with all of the officials roaming around sporting badges at PGA tournaments, isn't it high time that a new rule was adopted assigning to one of them the specific task of checking the score-card of each player as he leaves the 18th green? They could then make sure that everything is in order, including the signature, before the card is turned in.

The PGA, as you pointed out in a previous article, is supposed to be the pros' own organization, not their adversary.
HAROLD R. GORDON
Chicago

Sirs:
For the past year and a half I was a student at the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League institution. Now, voluntarily, I have transferred to UCLA. Holy inferiority! We do have the 1.6 rule here for athletes and, even with the "horrible" pressure, we do seem to field some "fairly" good teams. Holy Rose Bowl! Now the Ivy League refuses to comply with the NCAA rule. Holy mutiny!

Why then, old Halls of Ivy, did you abolish athletic scholarships? Holy tuition! Wasn't it to protect dear old alma mater from those nasty little athletes? Holy sweat sock! Now they say they won't hinder their athletes with this terrible rule.

Holy Boola, Boola! Who do they think they're kidding? They're just trying to substitute controversy for the terrible lack of spirit that permeates Ivy League athletics. Holy pompon girls! We have great spirit at UCLA and, although I realize it's bordering on blasphemy, I find UCLA more stimulating intellectually, too.
STEPHEN S. DEUTSCH
Los Angeles

SOARING CHAMPIONSHIPS
Sirs:
Gwilym Brown's superb coverage of the National AAU championships in Albuquerque (Soaring Above Snafus, March 14) clearly illustrated the need of the AAU to transfer this important meet to other cities of the U.S. When you see eight world and nine championship records tied or broken you wonder about the quality of the competition in New York. Incidentally, Brown may not know that following the meet Bert Nelson, publisher of Track & Field News, stated that in his opinion this was the finest indoor meet in history! Quite a tribute from a Californian!
BENJAMIN K. HORTON
Albuquerque

Sirs:
If organization means anything the AAU has already lost its battle with the NCAA!
GREG SHIVELY
Catonsville, Md.

KNOCKOUT DROPS
Sirs:
The best way to restore the sport of boxing to its former position of eminence is through articles like Tex Maule's A Quarry Who Likes to Hunt (March 14). It is fine boxers such as Jerry Quarry, Tony Doyle and Joe Frazier who will return national respect to the sport.
RAYMOND F. MORGAN
Exeter, N.H.

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