SI Vault
 
A roundup of the sports information of the week
May 02, 1966
BASKETBALL—NBA: After dropping the first game of the championship finals at home, BOSTON rushed by the Lakers for three victories in a row—129-109 in Boston, 120-106 and 122-117 in LA—and leaped to a 3-1 lead. But LOS ANGELES kept the series alive by defeating the Celtics 121-117 in Boston as Elgin Baylor and Jerry West combined for 72 points.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
May 02, 1966

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

BASKETBALL—NBA: After dropping the first game of the championship finals at home, BOSTON rushed by the Lakers for three victories in a row—129-109 in Boston, 120-106 and 122-117 in LA—and leaped to a 3-1 lead. But LOS ANGELES kept the series alive by defeating the Celtics 121-117 in Boston as Elgin Baylor and Jerry West combined for 72 points.

BOATING—Miami Engineer JIM WYNNE, 35, in his 28-foot Formula VII powerboat Ghost Rider, won the Miami-to-Nassau race, postponed five days because of high winds, in 3:51:4, finishing 10 minutes ahead of Defending Champion Don Aronow.

BOXING—CLEVELAND WILLIAMS, 33, the Houston heavyweight, who has one of boxing's best knockout records with 50 KOs, won his 68th bout when he gained a unanimous 10-round decision over Sonny Moore, a Dallas policeman, in Houston.

GOLF—"It was like climbing a mountain," said Mrs. Nancy Roth Syms, a 27-year-old blonde from Hollywood, Fla., as she scored a 1-up victory over Phyllis (Tish) Preuss, also 27, of Pompano Beach, Fla., in the North-South Amateur tournament at Pinehurst, N.C. Miss Preuss had held the lead until the 17th hole when Mrs. Syms knocked in a 14-foot putt for a birdie 2, giving her a one-stroke edge, which she held as both women matched par on the 18th hole.

Carol Mann of Towson, Md. took her second LPGA tournament in a row when she shot a 216 for the 54 holes to win the Betsy Rawls Peach Blossom tournament in Spartanburg, S.C. by a stroke over Mrs. Marlene Hagge of Pensacola, Fla.

HANDBALL—PAUL HABER, 29, of San Jose, Calif., who returned to the handball circuit after a six-year absence, took the national singles title by defeating Bill Yambrick, 25, of St. Paul, 21-20 and 21-13 at the U.S. Handball Association's four-wall championships in Salt Lake City. The unranked Haber, who beat top-seeded Dave Graybill of Phoenix in the quarter-finals and third-seeded Marty Decatur of New York in the semifinals, then teamed with Paul Morlos of Vancouver, B.C. in doubles but lost in the finals to PETE TYSON and BOB LINDSAY of Austin, Texas. In the Masters' players-over-40 competition, VIC HERSHKOWITZ, 47, of Brooklyn, won the singles title, beating Bob Brady, 44, of San Francisco, 21-15, 6-21, 21-12. Jimmy Jacobs (SI, March 7, 1966), the 1965 singles and doubles champion, did not compete because of back trouble.

HARNESS RACING—New Zealand-bred pacer CARDIGAN BAY, with little competition, won the $50,000 Good Time Pace at Yonkers by three lengths over Adora's Dream. "It was easy," said Driver Stanley Dancer. There was no betting allowed on Cardigan because of the minus pool—the largest in harness history—he created a week earlier when he won the International.

Armbro Flight ($2.60), a 4-year-old Canadian-owned filly driven by Joe O'Brien, gained her 13th straight victory and her 45th in 56 races when she won the $60,250 Speedster Trot Stakes at Washington Park by three lengths over All Aflame.

HOCKEY—NHL: Dean Prentice scored two goals only 63 seconds apart in the last minutes of play to give DETROIT a 3-2 win over Chicago and the Stanley Cup semifinal series 4-2. In the first game of the cup final against Montreal, winner of the other semifinal in four straight games over Toronto, the Red Wings skated to a 3-1 lead early in the final period and held on to win 3-2.

HORSE RACING—Some owners and trainers with Kentucky Derby hopes said a lot of ifs and maybes, while others planned the trip to Louisville after three favorites lost in Derby tests in the East and in California (page 64). Ogden Phipps's favored Impressive finished last in a field of 11 3-year-olds in the 1?-mile Wood Memorial at Aqueduct, as Reginald N. Webster's AMBEROID ($19.80) scored a victory by two lengths over Mrs. Ada L. Rice's Advocator and, at Bowie, Stupendous, Mrs. H. C. Phipps's 5-to-2 favorite, failed to catch KAUAI KING ($7.60) in the stretch and lost the $118,500 Governor's Gold Cup, a 1 1/16-mile race, by three lengths. Said Kauai King's owner, Michael J. Ford, "We're certainly entering him."

Continue Story
1 2