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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
June 13, 1966
BATTING ORDERSirs:In your May 23 SCORECARD, you mentioned the bat-swinging incidents which have taken place recently in baseball. You also suggested that, in the next such incident, Commissioner Eckert ban the offending player from baseball forever.
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June 13, 1966

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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BATTING ORDER
Sirs:
In your May 23 SCORECARD, you mentioned the bat-swinging incidents which have taken place recently in baseball. You also suggested that, in the next such incident, Commissioner Eckert ban the offending player from baseball forever.

I must disagree with this position. When, in 1919, eight members of the Chicago White Sox threw the World Series, Commissioner Landis banned them from ever again participating in organized baseball. To suggest that a person who undertook to strike a fellow player with a bat be given the same punishment is absurd.

As for the idea that such a punishment might deter a player from smashing another with a bat, it wouldn't. In such a heated argument, there is no time for thought. If there were, no player would ever strike another, regardless of the punishment. I, personally, am for strengthening baseball's rule in this matter, but I feel the punishment should fit the crime.
TOM ABRAHAM
Berwyn, Ill.

Sirs:
Your suggestion that Commissioner Eckert be prepared to take harsh disciplinary action in future cases involving attacks on players with baseball bats is an excellent one. Should he do this, however, notices to that effect posted in clubhouses should be printed in Spanish as well as in English.
THEODORE A. NESBIT
Manchester, Mass.

HIGH SEA
Sirs:
In the tradition of men who go to sea, a hearty "well done" for your article on the U.S. Coast Guard's Search and Rescue operations (S A R, May 30).

We of the Lake Tahoe Coast Guard Auxiliary are especially proud that you mentioned our "ocean in the sky." We are perhaps the smallest auxiliary in service and have a short two-to three-month season, but we manage to put in several thousand man-hours patrolling our better than 100 miles of coastline every summer. We patrol regattas, races, take part in Search and Rescue and even were called upon in the middle of a summer night last year to rescue an 1890 wood-burning steamboat. Our auxiliary fleet is composed of everything from $250 outboards to $50,000 cruisers plus a twin-engine aircraft. We are grateful to SI for the recognition you have given the USCG and the oft unsung Auxiliary.
ROBERT W. DUMM
Carnelian Bay, Calif.

NOM DE CHEVAL
Sirs:
Maybe I'm just an innocent abroad and should know all about Godolphin Darley, the French turf writer who helped your Whitney Tower talk to France's Francois Mathet (LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER, June 6). I don't know about M. Darley, but I do know enough about horse racing to remember that all modern Thoroughbreds are descended from three ancestors whose names, if I mistake not, were 1) the Darley Arabian, 2) the Godolphin Arabian and 3) the Byerley Turk. Because of this, I suspect that their apparent namesake is writing under a nom de cheval. Am I right?
F. H. VON STADE
Lexington, Ky.

?Right. The real name of this noted writer, handicapper, breeding theorist, sales agent and general promoter is Albert Neuhut.—ED.

YANKEES YES
Sirs:
I was born and raised on the Yankees and, consequently, I feel closely tied to their spirit and frame of mind. The juggling act of their higher echelons in recent years has somewhat appalled me, as did their slump last year. When they bounced Ralph Houk upstairs at the end of the '63 season, I began to have fears, for Houk was clearly a man who injected a winning spirit into the team. The following two years bore out my fears as Berra struggled to a pennant and Keane—beset by injuries, it is true—had no luck at all.

Therefore, I think William Leggett got caught off base in his article, A Dying Team Screams for Help (May 16). True, the Yankees' latest move is radical, but "panic stricken"? No. Instead, it appears that, for once, the front office is willing to admit a mistake and, from that point of view, they took the most direct step to correct it.

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