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A HAPPY STROLL FOR GOLF'S SMILING GEI
Dan Jenkins
August 01, 1966
Easy-moving Al Geiberger, who does everything the orthodox way, shoots par golf to win a PGA Championship that was otherwise distinguished by some of the strangest doings in the history of the event
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August 01, 1966

A Happy Stroll For Golf's Smiling Gei

Easy-moving Al Geiberger, who does everything the orthodox way, shoots par golf to win a PGA Championship that was otherwise distinguished by some of the strangest doings in the history of the event

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"Yeah," Sam said, "but then if you're way far away from it, you got to hit it twice."

The final surprise of the PGA was provided by 27-year-old Dudley Wysong, who was playing in the championship for the first time. Wysong looks and acts like most any Texas boy: blond crew cut, bleached eyebrows and a somewhat astonished expression. It became even more astonished when he singed off what little fairway grass was left at sun-scarred Firestone by shooting a superb 66 on Saturday, the low round of the tournament, and moving into second place, a position he defended excellently on Sunday to win $15,000.

Wysong started the final 18 with two bogeys and thought, "I'm gonna shoot 90. I can feel it." Watching him address the ball, you knew why. He didn't know where it was. He stands up to the ball well, except that it is nowhere near the club head. Instead, it is far underneath the heel, as if he were taking a practice swing way out in front of the ball.

"It's distracting," said Mike Souchak, who was paired with Dudley the first two rounds and, incidentally, missed the cut. "You're all the time thinking, he's 8 to 5 to fan it."

"I've always addressed the ball that way," says Wysong. "I just can't hit it if I address ii off the toe like a lot of players do."

Had he ever considered putting the club face directly behind the ball, like it says in the instruction books?

"I don't think I could hit it that way," he says. "See, I have to get back on my heels when I swing through. And my system helps me do it." Why not? For this PGA, even that made sense.

In the end, it must have been very comforting to the PGA that Al Geiberger won the championship. His game is so sound that he has been due to win a big one for a long time, and deserves it. But more important, he stands erect when he putts, with the leather grip in his hands, and when he addresses a shot he puts the face of the club squarely behind the ball, which is just the way all those club pros who teach the game and run the PGA say you have to do it if you ever expect to play a lick.

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