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CAUGHT ON A BARBLESS HOOK
Pat Ryan
August 08, 1966
They were given no real chance to beat the Americans, but a jolly band of British girls might well have made off with the Curtis Cup if they had not kept coming to grief beside an old trout pond
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August 08, 1966

Caught On A Barbless Hook

They were given no real chance to beat the Americans, but a jolly band of British girls might well have made off with the Curtis Cup if they had not kept coming to grief beside an old trout pond

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The next day the British lost three more matches on the same two holes. In the morning Liz Chadwick and Ita Burke beat Anne Welts and Barbara McIntire 1 up, but the other two British teams were defeated at the 17th. At lunch the U.S. was ahead 9 to 3 and Pam Tredinnick said, "Well, we've got to win all the singles to halve the Cup." Mrs. Bolton told the team stoutly, "Go ahead, girls, go ahead. You have nothing to lose." But they had lost far too much already. Late Saturday afternoon an English woman was heard to mumble as another British ball headed for trouble on 17, "It's this welfare state. Everything is done for them. They never have to think any more for themselves."

But that was hardly fair. They had presented a stronger challenge than expected to the Americans, and the U.S. had responded by remaining composed when the pressure was on. If anything, the British had done too much thinking as they stood on 17 and 18 looking at that tranquil trout pond.

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