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IF CASSIUS CAN'T PUNCH, THEN LONDON ISN'T DOWN
John Lovesey
August 15, 1966
Brian London talked a better fight than he gave, and Cassius Clay, for a change, gave a better fight than he talked. The bout did prove the champion can punch, no matter what the Blackpool Bulldog said
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August 15, 1966

If Cassius Can't Punch, Then London Isn't Down

Brian London talked a better fight than he gave, and Cassius Clay, for a change, gave a better fight than he talked. The bout did prove the champion can punch, no matter what the Blackpool Bulldog said

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The only lesson of the fight, apart from the obvious one of human gullibility, was the underscoring of Clay's punching speed and the pulverizing momentum of power that he builds up with them. They were, he explained, "fast and snappy, more of a shock," and in that sense London may have been correct when he said Clay was not a puncher. But only in that sense.

For his fight with London, Clay revealed, he had concentrated on hitting power. "I could have been faster for this fight," he said, "if I'd weighed 201 instead of 210 pounds. I was not just out for a knockout, but I have another fight in five weeks, and a long one now would have taken too much out of me."

No doubt Clay will trim down for his fight with Karl Mildenberger in Frankfurt next month. If not, he should. Unlike London, the German heavyweight has a reputation for running in the ring like "a scared crow." As for Brian London, he would like a return with Cassius Clay, but only, as he told the champion, if he ties "a 56-pound weight" to each leg. Even on these terms the fight would be a one-sided affair.

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