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An open approach for a treacherous sand
Jack Nicklaus
August 29, 1966
Frequently on the pro tour, including places like Pebble Beach in California and Augusta National in Georgia, we encounter bunkers filled with a type of sand that is unusually white, quite pretty and very difficult to play out of. This sand, which is known as glass sand, is used at many good courses. Unfortunately, it is so soft and fine that, instead of resisting the force of the club head and thus bouncing it up toward the ball, it tends to pull the club head down, which prevents the explosion effect that you get with a normal bunker shot. As a result, you need a different shot for glass sand. First, open the face of the wedge to allow the club's rounded flange to create more of a bounce effect than it usually would. This will counteract the tendency of the sand to force the club head down too deep. Take the club back on a fairly low trajectory, resisting the natural impulse to pick it up too sharply, and come into the ball from only a slight outside-in angle instead of the decidedly outside-in swing used in the normal explosion shot. The club head will not take a lot of sand, and so you won't get much backspin on the shot, but the ball will get up and out of the bunker.
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August 29, 1966

An Open Approach For A Treacherous Sand

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Frequently on the pro tour, including places like Pebble Beach in California and Augusta National in Georgia, we encounter bunkers filled with a type of sand that is unusually white, quite pretty and very difficult to play out of. This sand, which is known as glass sand, is used at many good courses. Unfortunately, it is so soft and fine that, instead of resisting the force of the club head and thus bouncing it up toward the ball, it tends to pull the club head down, which prevents the explosion effect that you get with a normal bunker shot. As a result, you need a different shot for glass sand. First, open the face of the wedge to allow the club's rounded flange to create more of a bounce effect than it usually would. This will counteract the tendency of the sand to force the club head down too deep. Take the club back on a fairly low trajectory, resisting the natural impulse to pick it up too sharply, and come into the ball from only a slight outside-in angle instead of the decidedly outside-in swing used in the normal explosion shot. The club head will not take a lot of sand, and so you won't get much backspin on the shot, but the ball will get up and out of the bunker.

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