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A bull with brains
September 19, 1966
When he is standing there at the blackboard diagraming Ohio State's noble off-tackle smash, Coach Woody Hayes occasionally gets so excited he sends that O (representing his tackle) slamming into that V (theirs) with such force the chalk crumbles into a fine, white powder. It is not the play that stimulates Hayes so much as the name behind the O. He has been making a handsome living for years driving footballs through the same tackle hole, but always it has been the big man up front who has made the play work. In 1955-56 it was Jim Parker, in 1958 Jim Marshall and in 1965 Doug Van Horn.
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September 19, 1966

A Bull With Brains

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When he is standing there at the blackboard diagraming Ohio State's noble off-tackle smash, Coach Woody Hayes occasionally gets so excited he sends that O (representing his tackle) slamming into that V (theirs) with such force the chalk crumbles into a fine, white powder. It is not the play that stimulates Hayes so much as the name behind the O. He has been making a handsome living for years driving footballs through the same tackle hole, but always it has been the big man up front who has made the play work. In 1955-56 it was Jim Parker, in 1958 Jim Marshall and in 1965 Doug Van Horn.

Now comes Dave Foley. Next week against TCU Foley will start in his first college game, but already Hayes is calling the 6-foot-5, 242-pound tackle from Cincinnati's Roger Bacon High School "one of the very best linemen I've ever seen." And Hayes is not alone in his admiration for Foley's talents. "Why." exclaims Dave's father, Tom, a Cincinnati postal clerk, "I thought that telephone of ours would never stop ringing after he'd played in his last high school game. I don't know how many schools were calling him, but there were a lot."

Little wonder. Dave Foley was an honor student at Roger Bacon, graduating 30th in a class of 267. He was a school leader and in addition to starring for three years on offense and defense in football, he was a state champion high school shotputter, throwing the 12-pound ball as far as 62 feet 1� inches. He looked like a natural for Woody's turf-tearing offense from the start.

In his freshman year Foley established himself as an outstanding student in Ohio State's engineering school, finishing with an impressive 3.69 point average on the university's 4-point system. But it is still his football prowess that has everybody talking, including Tackle Coach Hugh Hindman. "Dave is bull-strong," says Hugh, "and his reactions are excellent. He's blessed with exceptional speed—enough, in fact, to make him just the explosive blocker we need on offense. Furthermore, he has native intelligence—the kind that allows him to adjust quickly to stunting defenses." Foley will be at right tackle, where he'll play alongside Guard Dick Himes (6 feet 5, 250 pounds) and All-Big Ten Center Ray Pryor. The trio gives the Buckeyes perhaps the strongest right side in the league and, should OSU get into trouble defensively, these three would be the first to be tapped for two-way duty. Foley's only weakness, according to father Tom, is golf. "He hits the ball a mile," he says. "The trouble is he hits the putts a mile, too."

Another sophomore to watch in the Midwest this year is Tailback Roland Moss of Toledo. Coach Frank Lauterbur called Moss one of the finest running backs he'd ever seen after the 6-foot-3, 215-pound blaster ran for 621 yards, 12 touchdowns and scored 79 points for the Rocket freshman team.

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