SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
September 19, 1966
THE BEAR PITSirs: Bear Bryant has an inflated sense of values concerning football (I'll Tell You About Football, Aug. 15 et seq.). He thinks his kind of football can teach a boy about life.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
September 19, 1966

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3

It takes a man to admit an obligation and a debt of honor.
BENEDICT F. BAYRUNS
Glendale, Calif.

K.C. KID
Sirs:
I heartily agree with one sentence in your article about Jim Nash ( Kansas City Gets a Kid to Build a Dream On, Aug. 29): "It has not been easy to be a Kansas City fan for the last 11 seasons."

But now, thanks to some exciting new talent ( Jim Nash and others), Mr. Finley's green stuff and Alvin Dark's managing, we Kansas City fans may be able to stand up and cheer.
MRS. WILLIAM L. CLARK
Shawnee Mission, Kans.

Sirs:
Thank you for William Leggett's article on Jim Nash, the best rookie pitcher in baseball. He is just what the Athletics need—to trade away. The A's can be great if they will just keep some of these good prospects.
GARY BELL
Overland Park, Kans.

TOO MUCH TOO SOON
Sirs:
I am a longtime subscriber to your magazine and certainly prefer baseball to all other sports, including the assorted trivia (curling, falconry, etc.) that you sometimes seem to prefer over the National Pastime. But I think it's high time someone said something about those griping softies who feel that having to play over five hours a day—even occasionally—is too much.

Baseball players are paid very handsomely for their eight-month part-time job as compared to any nonsporting vocation, but a few apparently are too spoiled to realize it. On the other hand, I will be the first to agree that the season is too long and should be shortened. You can overdo a good thing, and April to October is a little much.

As for interleague play, I can't see this at all. The NFL is a perfect example of this. It's superfluous to even have two leagues. Certainly the American League is all for it. They need something to make up for their obvious lack of talent.
EDDIE CLINTON
Memphis

SUNKEN RECORD
Sirs:
I enjoyed Pat Ryan's recent chronicle of the misfortunes suffered by the British Curtis Cup team on the trout-infested closing holes of the Cascades golf course in Hot Springs, Va. (Caught on a Barbless Hook, Aug. 8). I was chagrined, however, to find that the British gals-for all their troubles—apparently failed to match or surpass the dubious distinction that befell me on the ponded 18th a few years back.

Needing a par 3 to break 80 and, as it turned out, to win a match, I managed to cuff two straight three-iron tee shots into the middle of the trout pond. My third effort, however, was a thing of beauty. It sailed, majestically, all of 50 or 60 yards into the pond. It wasn't a ball. It was my three-iron.

I was immediately informed that I had set an alltime record for the three-iron throw at Cascades. As far as I know, alas, the record still stands.
J. WILLIAM JONES
King of Prussia, Pa.

1 2 3