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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 24, 1966
BALAMERSirs:Along with many Baltimoreans, I was both amused and amazed by Mark Kram's article (A Wink at a Homely Girl, Oct. 10). It was well done, but I just cannot take his deft almost-truths about our town lying down, particularly in view of recent events here. I was lucky to be right in the middle of our great Series activities, and I can report that Baltimore was just great! In no conceivable way was it "embarrassed by the presence of a World Series."
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October 24, 1966

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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BALAMER
Sirs:
Along with many Baltimoreans, I was both amused and amazed by Mark Kram's article (A Wink at a Homely Girl, Oct. 10). It was well done, but I just cannot take his deft almost-truths about our town lying down, particularly in view of recent events here. I was lucky to be right in the middle of our great Series activities, and I can report that Baltimore was just great! In no conceivable way was it "embarrassed by the presence of a World Series."

I suspect Mr. Kram believed, as the odds-makers did, that Baltimore would be as he portrayed it—a loser. But we who were there will always remember the positive things that helped make Baltimore a proud winner.

Despite Mr. Kram's cleverly contrived "cries of offended passion," he has done Baltimore a disservice by creating an inaccurate image of his former home town for the world to see. For my money, he is just another articulate knocker, even though there may be a sympathetic heart beating behind the darts.
DAVID P. BARRETT
Baltimore

Sirs:
Some Baltimoreans resented Kram's article because they felt it was insulting. I, for one, feel otherwise. This is the real Baltimore—not just a city but a way of life. It is the only city in the world like it.

No doubt you have heard what happened the night the Orioles won the Series. The city came completely unglued. As a result it has been criticized as "bush." But let me relate an incident I witnessed during the celebration. A man well past the point of intoxication decided to take a swing at two policemen. The trouble was that he swung from behind and with a bottle. Both policemen went down, more stunned than hurt. Before the officers could get to their feet, the crowd—yes, the crowd—grabbed the drunk and held him until the officers could take charge. How about that, New York, Chicago and Los Angeles?

Baltimore may be a "homely girl." If it is, then I am in love with a homely girl.
HOLTON F. BROWN
Baltimore

Sirs:
The opinion of one occasional visitor to that Maryland city is that the restaurants are far from bad, and the natives are friendly, hospitable and, appropriately, reasonably proud of their two fine teams. If they want to call it "Balamer," what's that to you? No one, pal, with any accent, is about to make "a New Yorker, by comparison, sound like Laurence Olivier."
H. BRETT TUTTRUP
Chicago

Sirs:
While I do not desire to submerge Mark Kram in Chesapeake Bay, I find it very difficult to see his point of view. Perhaps this is because I do not visit the side-street bars or live in a block of red-brick, trimmed row houses on Eastern Avenue. Since this is where he seems to have drawn his conclusions, I suggest he look again and maybe he'll see us as we are today and not 20 years ago. Baltimore is a World Champion town. We deserve it, and we're not embarrassed by it. So, Mr. Kram, please hitch up your wagon and save your winks for someplace else, because we don't need them.
JOAN K. BUSCH
Baltimore

Sirs:
As an ex-Baltimorean, I agree wholeheartedly with Mr. Kram's fine article. Baltimore is a great town to be from.
EUGENE M. WALDRON JR.
Washington

OBIT
Sirs:
Now that the American League has so thoroughly humiliated the National League champs in the abbreviated 1966 World Series, let it spell an end to the hard-sell promotion of National League play at the expense of the AL. I have read several articles pointing to the success of Frank Robinson in the AL as an indicator of AL inferiority. This reasoning overlooks the fact that Frank was a star in the NL for 10 years before the trade that sent him to the Orioles. Completely forgotten is the fact that several not-so-stellar players from the AL have recently found stardom in the "other" league. Phil Regan (ERA and won-lost leader in NL for 1966), Deron Johnson (1965 RBI champ), Jim Bunning (perfect game, three 19-win seasons), John Callison and Lou Johnson are only a few who come to mind.
ISAAC W. WALKER
Long Beach, N.Y.

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