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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
October 31, 1966
DEFEATSirs:As is oft said, "One picture is worth a thousand words." The nearest approximation to this adage that has met my eye in many a day was presented in the issue of SI containing the coverage of the World Series (Oct. 17). The moment when fate struck Willie Davis for the first time that afternoon is graphically depicted, but there is something more stunning in the photograph than the Dodger center fielder's bobble or the ball that is falling from his grasp. It is the faces of the crowd behind him. Nothing written by the capable men of the press, nothing uttered by the knowledgeable broadcasters, has captured or could ever capture the exact moment of Dodger defeat as does that photograph. And it was defeat, gentlemen, as surely as Sandy Koufax is the best pitcher of this modern era. From that moment on, the Dodgers and their fans became disbelievers in the fact that the L.A. club was the best team in baseball. It was this belief that carried the Dodgers to the pennant. They didn't win the pennant with pitching; they won it because they parlayed the arms of Koufax, Osteen, Drysdale and Sutton with the belief that they were the best team in organized baseball. When Davis bared his mortality in that fateful inning, both the Dodgers, and their fans, realized the horrifying possibility that maybe they weren't the best. Look at the faces in that crowd, and ask yourselves if it is not defeat and disbelief that you see. There, gentlemen, in that photograph, is the unbelievable story of the 1966 World Series.FRANK GRIFFIN Somerville, Mass.
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October 31, 1966

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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1. NICKLAUS

$5,598

2. CASPER

5,315

3. PALMER

3,986

4. BREWER

2,901

5. LITTLER

2,802

6. DEVLIN

2,730

7. SANDERS

2,629

8. JANUARY

2.460

9. RODGERS

2,412

10. GEIBERGER

2,339

11. R. H. SIKES

2,282

12. BEARD

2,210

DEFEAT
Sirs:
As is oft said, "One picture is worth a thousand words." The nearest approximation to this adage that has met my eye in many a day was presented in the issue of SI containing the coverage of the World Series (Oct. 17). The moment when fate struck Willie Davis for the first time that afternoon is graphically depicted, but there is something more stunning in the photograph than the Dodger center fielder's bobble or the ball that is falling from his grasp. It is the faces of the crowd behind him. Nothing written by the capable men of the press, nothing uttered by the knowledgeable broadcasters, has captured or could ever capture the exact moment of Dodger defeat as does that photograph. And it was defeat, gentlemen, as surely as Sandy Koufax is the best pitcher of this modern era. From that moment on, the Dodgers and their fans became disbelievers in the fact that the L.A. club was the best team in baseball. It was this belief that carried the Dodgers to the pennant. They didn't win the pennant with pitching; they won it because they parlayed the arms of Koufax, Osteen, Drysdale and Sutton with the belief that they were the best team in organized baseball. When Davis bared his mortality in that fateful inning, both the Dodgers, and their fans, realized the horrifying possibility that maybe they weren't the best. Look at the faces in that crowd, and ask yourselves if it is not defeat and disbelief that you see. There, gentlemen, in that photograph, is the unbelievable story of the 1966 World Series.
FRANK GRIFFIN
Somerville, Mass.

SWING LOW
Sirs:
Congratulations to Dan Jenkins on his article about the best quarterback in the American Football League, Joe Willie Namath (The Sweet Life of Swinging Joe, Oct. 17). It gave me real insight into the life of this truly cool guy. Mr. Jenkins says that if Joe stays healthy he will achieve his greatest ambition, which is to become a good quarterback rather than a rich one. I feel that he has already achieved that ambition.
DAVID LICHTENBERG
Hempstead, N.Y.

Sirs:
What happened to Dan Jenkins? He used to be pretty clearheaded. Now he says " Joe Namath may be Johnny Unitas and Paul Hornung rolled into one"! Is that the statement of a sane man? Namath may be tops in the AFL, but there are about 14 quarterbacks in the NFL that are better. It isn't right to put Namath's name on the same page with that of John Unitas.
CHARLES W. FEHR
St. Louis Park, Minn.

Sirs:
What you're saying is that Namath couldn't pass a bad check. Compare him to Fran Tarkenton and the same would hold true for a football.
JOHN MORGAN
Des Moines

Sirs:
That Namath article is one I would have expected to find in some girlie magazine, not in SI. I'm sure if you looked you could have found someone who fills the image of an athlete that our young people could look up to. In my opinion, the NFL is fortunate he didn't sign with St. Louis.
MRS. R. J. GRADE
Minneapolis

Sirs:
Your story was excellent, but you really did not have to make one of the better quarterbacks sound like a hick, putting "man" at the end of all those sentences. Leave some out next time, even if Joe said them all.
ERIC GUSTAVSON
Los Altos Hills, Calif.

CIVIL WAR
Sirs:
I see in your pages that Pro Quarterback Joe Namath is "touchy" about all the publicity given Notre Dame. I agree with him. Notre Dame, which is now playing the softest schedule it has had in years, is always in the top 10 after it has crushed such powers as Northwestern 38-7. Then when the Irish come up against a real team such as Purdue and Michigan State they are put in their proper, mediocre place. After the rise and fall of Notre Dame over the past two seasons, the experts should know better.

But Alabama is also a very pampered team in the polls. In 1964 'Bama went 10-0, to the Orange Bowl and the national championship. Then it lost to Texas 21-17 but still maintained its national crown.
PAUL BURNAM
Akron

Sirs:
Namath's statement, "I'll guarantee you that a team like Louisiana Tech can beat about 80 of those lousy schools up here [in the East]," is obviously a strike at the press for its comments on Alabama's "easy schedule" (which includes Louisiana Tech). Unfortunately, what he says is true.

Without a doubt the East is at the bottom of the barrel in collegiate football, where they have been nestled for several years. The only region that plays worse football is the Yucatan Peninsula.

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