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NEVER TO BE THE SAME
Robert Cantwell
December 19, 1966
An era ended and a startling new one began not long after the end of the 1941 football season, in which the 26 members of the 1966 Silver Anniversary All-America team played their last college games
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December 19, 1966

Never To Be The Same

An era ended and a startling new one began not long after the end of the 1941 football season, in which the 26 members of the 1966 Silver Anniversary All-America team played their last college games

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And, without exception, they retained an enthusiasm for football. Sometimes there is a professional interest. Dr. Loyal Combs is medical director and team physician at Purdue. Bill Dudley, who played with the Pittsburgh Steelers, the Detroit Lions and the Washington Redskins after the war, takes some time off from his insurance business in Lynchburg to scout college players for professional teams. But usually the devotion to football of these experts consists of attendance at whatever games they can get to. Otherwise their recreational interests are varied. Kirby hunts with the Spring Valley Hounds, Geyer hunts in Africa, Dr. Biggs races his sloop in transpacific races, Robert Barnett grinds precious stones for recreation, Colonel Murphy hammers and saws and does cabinetwork around his home in Alexandria, Va. And there are water skiers, fishermen and weekend golfers among them. But they follow football with an intensity that can hardly be appreciated except by other enthusiasts of their generation. "The big game is better today," Bill Dudley says, "more specialization, with bigger, better, faster players." But he says of two-platoon football: "When a ballplayer doesn't go both ways, he misses something."

Or, as Bob Peters puts it, "Football has come into its own today and is much more exciting to watch. The boys are bigger and faster now. Still, I miss the old workhorses who could do many things and do them well."

That might serve as a fair description of the generation, a group of old workhorses who have done many things. And, perhaps more important, they seem to be ready for almost anything the future may bring.

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