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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
January 23, 1967
IN THE POCKETSirs: Bob Ottum's article, Wimpy Was a Sleeping Beauty (Jan. 9), captures the deep excitement of pocket billiards as no one else has ever done. Thanks for bringing your readers this kind of reporting on sports and events that need and deserve greater understanding.STANLEY R. MARCH Pittsburgh
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January 23, 1967

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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IN THE POCKET
Sirs:
Bob Ottum's article, Wimpy Was a Sleeping Beauty (Jan. 9), captures the deep excitement of pocket billiards as no one else has ever done. Thanks for bringing your readers this kind of reporting on sports and events that need and deserve greater understanding.
STANLEY R. MARCH
Pittsburgh

Sirs:
The game of pool has never turned me on, but Bob Ottum's description of Luther Lassiter's and Cicero Murphy's tense world-championship match made me an excited member of the "gallery" at the Golden Q.
PAUL B. GREIN
Bay City, Mich.

DOGPATCH
Sirs:
As a student at Southern Illinois University, I would like to take issue with your classification of SIU as a school "that may be known in Dogpatch, Ky. but nowhere else" (A Win over Northern Cookin', Jan. 9). You mentioned that Louisville beat us by four points. This is true, but you failed to mention the double overtime. On January 11 we had a return match, this time on our home court. It was Louisville's first defeat of the season.
STEVE HANCE
Carbondale, Ill.

Sirs:
In basketball Southern Illinois has beaten St. Louis U., Texas Western and Louisville. The rest of the sports program is even more spectacular. Our gymnastics team has won national championships in both men's and women's divisions, and our baseball team last year moved up to the NCAA university-division tournament.

Please, give us just a little article.
CHUCK POLLACK
Brooklyn

DETOUR
Sirs:
Congratulations on the article Cops, Dogs and Snowmobiles Without Snow (Jan. 9) by Frank Sleeper. James Langley and Clark Dahlin are typical of our rugged and venturous Minnesota outdoorsmen.

However, in the interest of truth, may I point out that former Governor Karl F. Rolvaag did not ask the two snowmobilers to make a detour so that "he could be photographed having coffee with them." Governor Rolvaag wired Dahlin and Langley in Oregon before the start of the trip, offering his best wishes for their success and suggesting that, if they were in the vicinity of the State Capitol in St. Paul, they might stop in so that he could express his feelings in person. Since Governor Rolvaag had already been defeated in the November election, he was not attempting personal puffery. Governor Rolvaag was the greatest outdoorsman of any chief executive the State of Minnesota has ever had. In fact, when Langley and Dahlin arrived at the State Capitol, the Governor promptly hopped on one of the snowmobiles and raced it around the snow-covered Capitol lawn.
BRENDAN J. CONNELLY
St. Paul

FOCAL POINTS
Sirs:
Congratulations on some of the finest photography I have ever seen. Your cameramen always seem to know when a big play is going to pop up. My favorite picture had always been that of Notre Dame's Jim Lynch landing on his head in the November 28 issue of SI. However, the January 9 photograph of Boyd Dowler flying through the air is running a strong second.

Now I am anxiously waiting for some color pictures of the world's fastest sport—hockey—and the world's best hockey team, the New York Rangers.
MITCH LITWAK
Brooklyn

HORSE SENSE
Sirs:
Your Scorecard item (Jan. 2) stating that the equestrian events of the 1968 Olympic Games would be held at Oaxtepec, Mexico because of the lower altitude is quite misleading. There will be four equestrian events in the 1968 Games—grand dressage, individual jumping, team jumping, and the three-day event. The first three listed above will be held in Mexico City, with the team jumping to be held in the Olympic Stadium on the closing day, as usual. Competent veterinary authorities believe that in the dressage, which is executed at no more than a fast canter and lasts about nine minutes, and in the jumping, where the horse is required to cover a course of approximately 1,100 yards at a speed of 15 mph, the effect of the altitude on the animals will not be severe.

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