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How to tell if everything is under control
Jack Nicklaus
February 06, 1967
Many golfers think that overswinging automatically creates more power, that there is a direct ratio between the size of the swing and the power it generates. But this thinking is wrong. You get maximum power only by swinging within what I like to think of as the confines of your feet. There are two basic rules governing this: 1) you do not want to let your weight be on the outside of your right foot during the backswing, and 2) you do not want your weight on the outside of your left foot until after you make contact with the ball. Here is how I work with the knees, ankles and feet during my swing. I start with my weight evenly distributed on the balls of my feet. As I shift my weight to the inside of my right foot on the backswing, I roll my left foot in. The left knee turns in naturally, but the right knee remains fairly stationary. Now, as I come into the ball, my right knee turns and my weight moves off the ball of my right foot and onto my left. The right knee, meanwhile, is moving straight at the hole. After impact the weight moves farther, until it is on the outside of the left foot. Eventually my weight is far to the left, and my right heel is well off the ground. This may give the impression of overswinging, but it is not until the ball has been hit that the weight gets outside of the left foot.
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February 06, 1967

How To Tell If Everything Is Under Control

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Many golfers think that overswinging automatically creates more power, that there is a direct ratio between the size of the swing and the power it generates. But this thinking is wrong. You get maximum power only by swinging within what I like to think of as the confines of your feet. There are two basic rules governing this: 1) you do not want to let your weight be on the outside of your right foot during the backswing, and 2) you do not want your weight on the outside of your left foot until after you make contact with the ball. Here is how I work with the knees, ankles and feet during my swing. I start with my weight evenly distributed on the balls of my feet. As I shift my weight to the inside of my right foot on the backswing, I roll my left foot in. The left knee turns in naturally, but the right knee remains fairly stationary. Now, as I come into the ball, my right knee turns and my weight moves off the ball of my right foot and onto my left. The right knee, meanwhile, is moving straight at the hole. After impact the weight moves farther, until it is on the outside of the left foot. Eventually my weight is far to the left, and my right heel is well off the ground. This may give the impression of overswinging, but it is not until the ball has been hit that the weight gets outside of the left foot.

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