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March 13, 1967
SHOULD ARNOLD GO SHOW BIZ?In his series on Arnold Palmer (page 32) Attorney Mark McCormack reveals the details of the proposed purchase of some of Palmer's businesses and services by NBC. We have no doubt that such a deal would be beneficial to Palmer and NBC, but there is some question about it being good for sport. Once again, as with the purchase of the Yankees by CBS, we are distressed to see television moving in. The industry has rarely given any indication that it appreciates the vital difference between show business and sport—that one can be staged, manipulated, gimmicked up, and the other cannot. Of equal consequence, television purports to be—with respect to sport—a journalistic medium. Even when it has no financial stake in teams or individual athletes it has shown a singular inability to function in its proper role of unbiased reporter or to make fair editorial comment. But as the owner of an athlete or club, a network is faced with a fundamental conflict of interest: covering the news and at the same time endeavoring to profit from it. No matter how careful his new owners might be with their use of Palmer, it is still to be deplored that one of the world's most prominent athletes should be drawing a monthly paycheck from a TV network.
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March 13, 1967

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SHOULD ARNOLD GO SHOW BIZ?
In his series on Arnold Palmer (page 32) Attorney Mark McCormack reveals the details of the proposed purchase of some of Palmer's businesses and services by NBC. We have no doubt that such a deal would be beneficial to Palmer and NBC, but there is some question about it being good for sport. Once again, as with the purchase of the Yankees by CBS, we are distressed to see television moving in. The industry has rarely given any indication that it appreciates the vital difference between show business and sport—that one can be staged, manipulated, gimmicked up, and the other cannot. Of equal consequence, television purports to be—with respect to sport—a journalistic medium. Even when it has no financial stake in teams or individual athletes it has shown a singular inability to function in its proper role of unbiased reporter or to make fair editorial comment. But as the owner of an athlete or club, a network is faced with a fundamental conflict of interest: covering the news and at the same time endeavoring to profit from it. No matter how careful his new owners might be with their use of Palmer, it is still to be deplored that one of the world's most prominent athletes should be drawing a monthly paycheck from a TV network.

THEM KIDS IS PLAYING LACROSSE
A press release extolling its lacrosse team comes to us from the Loomis School of Windsor, Conn. The release notes: "Most educators have generally placed Loomis among the top 10...schools in the country on the basis of their well-rounded cirriculum...." it may well be time for a recount.

THE LUCK OF THE IRISH

Since Jackie Robinson came up in 1947, the Negro has made what are known as Great Strides in baseball and elsewhere, which apparently doesn't include Fort Myers, Fla., where the Pittsburgh Pirates hold spring training.

Last week, Donn Clendenon, the Pirates' Negro first baseman, who is a college graduate and going for his law degree, arrived in Fort Myers at midnight. He had a reservation at the Holiday inn, but was told he couldn't have the room until 10 a.m., and since no other motels had vacancies, Clendenon, his wife and his 5-month-old son slept in their car in the Holiday Inn parking lot. The next morning he called a lady who runs a motel with efficiency apartments and was told two were available at $250 a month. Clendenon said fine, he'd be right over. When he got there the lady said that both units had just been taken. Clendenon took the room at the Holiday Inn for $20 a day until he managed to get a place for $327 a month. "You see what happens to you when you're Irish," says Clendenon.

FAIR SAILING

Just about every week, it seems, there is news of some doughty skipper setting out across the sea alone in a boat no bigger than a cockleshell. There is such a trend toward privation and loneliness among yachtsmen that it is refreshing to get word of a countertrend started by Vic Meyer of Sydney, Australia. In past years Meyer won a boodle of honors in ocean races, but he has given up all that and now sails his 57-foot steel yawl at a leisurely pace, so he can enjoy the company of his all-girl crew. When he touched back into Sydney after cruising more than 13,000 miles with a comely pair, the Australian yachting magazine, Seacraft, sent its Miss Sheila Patrick around to get the woman's angle.

"Do the girls cook?" Miss Patrick asked.

"Oh no, I do the cooking," Meyer replied. "I'm a hell of a good cook. My specialty is beef stroganoff. Chateaubriand and baked turkey are others."

"Do the girls navigate?"

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