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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
March 27, 1967
HOWARD THE GREATSirs: Howard Cosell is egotistical, self-righteous, tactless and often maudlin (Would You Let This Man Interview You? March 13). He is a genuinely disgusting person. Right? Wrong! Howard Cosell is, indeed, the greatest sportscaster around. Yet his ability to lift the sports interview out of the morass of triviality and insincerity is not his greatest asset or distinction. In a world populated by corporation men and faceless nonentities Howard Cosell stands as a last bastion against the cancer of conformity. The man is a man. This is the essence of Howard Cosell.GARY GROWE Bangor, Me.
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March 27, 1967

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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One more favor, though—cancel all subscriptions to the Bradenton training camp. It seems that the buildup has worked in a negative direction—the A's have won only a few exhibition games.
ROBERT T. KEARNEY
Olathe, Kans.

Sirs:
Before Alvin Dark envisions his team in the first division this season, it would be smarter for him to deal for a left-handed starting pitcher. Judging by his lineup of boy wonders it is quite obvious not one wears his glove on the right hand. Dark may have the best young mound corps in the league, but without a southpaw his team will find it difficult to escape the Dark cellar.

A suggested trade? All six for Whitey Ford.
J. ALLEN CALDERON
Providence

STICK WITH STALLBALL
Sirs:
Excellent article (Stallball—a Game to Sleep By, March 13) by Joe Jares, but I am opposed to any 24-or 30-second clock in college basketball. This would serve only to deprive today's coaches of the mechanisms used to pull off an upset—which is the most exciting and most anticipated event in the basketball world.

The stallers are booed constantly in their efforts to make a close game of an apparent mismatch, and yet these same so-called basketball fans turn around and cheer their own team for employing the same strategy. Besides, the defense is at fault a good percentage of the time, because they are obligated to force action if they are tied or behind in score. I say if the defense wants the basketball—let them go get it!
HAROLD STOEFFLER JR.
New Preston, Conn.

GIANT KILLER
Sirs:
Much has been written in your magazine searching for an answer to modify college basketball to offset the advantages of the supertall individual. I have enjoyed reading many of these proposals but none have easy answers.

I have one idea that seems workable and will not require new or strange rules, and can be adapted overnight without affecting the game as we know it. Use the regulation basketball court, but move the backboards three feet beyond the court. This will prevent the tall men from using their height advantage by camping under the boards and pulling in rebounds, and it will place a premium on shooting from the outside. Stuff shots and layups can still be made provided that the player makes a leaping shot and releases the ball prior to touching out of bounds. Otherwise, the present rules will be adequate to cover the game.
JOHN S. SANICH
El Paso

ALAS, NO VASSS
Sirs:
In your recent tennis article (Two Times One Equals Zero, March 13), Bill Talbert did not mention the most absurd aspect of the whole ridiculous week. The promoters of the amateur tournament, having rejected VASSS, could not decide on any one scoring system and so used three. As a result the tournament was conducted in such confusion that time ran out before the final match could be completed. Can you imagine paying $10 and then not seeing the ninth inning, the 18th hole or the fourth quarter?
JAMES VAN ALEN
Newport, R.I.

BACK TO SCHOOL
Sirs:
Congratulations for catching our orthographic deception (SCORECARD, March 13). Only those who know the difference between "cirriculum" and "curriculum" are considered for admission.
SAMUEL B. PIERSON
The Loomis School
Windsor, Conn.

?How about "their" and "its"?—ED.

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