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A news story long kept in frozen storage brings a half-forgotten adventure to life
Robert Cantwell
April 03, 1967
One of the few British soldiers to come out of the Battle of New Orleans with an enhanced reputation was a 28-year-old signal officer named John Franklin. Young Mr. Franklin had already given the Royal Navy 13 years of heroic service that ranged from mapping the Australian coast to fighting at Trafalgar before he ran up against Andrew Jackson. Four years after the battle was over and the war done, he led an expedition from Hudson's Bay to the Arctic. He returned to England three years later, having traveled 5,550 miles searching for a Northwest Passage to the Pacific.
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April 03, 1967

A News Story Long Kept In Frozen Storage Brings A Half-forgotten Adventure To Life

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Against the sweep of their Arctic achievement, even Captain Barry's duplicity seemed hardly worth mentioning, and Gilder's attitude when he learned that Barry had stolen their vital supplies was tinged more with disappointment than rebuke. "It is usually considered," he wrote, "that those who encounter the perils of Arctic travel have enough to contend with, from the very nature of the undertaking."

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