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Herman Weiskopf
June 19, 1967
Jim McGlothlin of the California Angels has a pleasant face—a Huckleberry Finn face full of freckles and forever creased with a soft smile. That's part of his trouble. People take one look at that youthful, mirthful countenance and they figure, nice kid, can't pitch. When he was 18, McGlothlin went to a Dodger tryout camp and struck out 12 batters in a row. Did the Dodgers offer him $200,000, a solid-gold Cadillac, the keys to Chavez Ravine? They did not. "It was the old show-biz story," McGlothlin recalls. "Don't call us, we'll call you." The Dodgers never called. But the Angels did, and now, at 23, Jim has some of the most dazzling pitching statistics this side of Cooperstown: a 6-1 record, a league-low ERA of 1.07, only one earned run given up in the last 49[2/3] innings. His maturation as a pitcher has been dramatically swift, especially in light of a four-year minor league record of 41-37 and a 3-4 mark as a part-time Angel the past two seasons. Against the Orioles last week, he had a 2-0 lead in the ninth inning with one man on and Frank Robinson, Boog Powell and Brooks Robinson coming up. He struck out all three. The shutout was McGlothlin's third straight and fourth of the year, and it gave him a total of 33 scoreless innings in a row, a team record. Angel fans are clamoring for Oriole Manager Hank Bauer to use McGlothlin in the July 11 All-Star Game in Anaheim. "He's got a chance," Bauer says. "You can't pitch any better than he has." Although born in Hollywood, Jim has remained immune to all the glitter. "Mac never puts on airs," says Angel Pitching Coach Bob Lemon. "He isn't temperamental. He's the easiest pitcher to get along with that I've ever known."
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June 19, 1967

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Jim McGlothlin of the California Angels has a pleasant face—a Huckleberry Finn face full of freckles and forever creased with a soft smile. That's part of his trouble. People take one look at that youthful, mirthful countenance and they figure, nice kid, can't pitch. When he was 18, McGlothlin went to a Dodger tryout camp and struck out 12 batters in a row. Did the Dodgers offer him $200,000, a solid-gold Cadillac, the keys to Chavez Ravine? They did not. "It was the old show-biz story," McGlothlin recalls. "Don't call us, we'll call you." The Dodgers never called. But the Angels did, and now, at 23, Jim has some of the most dazzling pitching statistics this side of Cooperstown: a 6-1 record, a league-low ERA of 1.07, only one earned run given up in the last 49[2/3] innings. His maturation as a pitcher has been dramatically swift, especially in light of a four-year minor league record of 41-37 and a 3-4 mark as a part-time Angel the past two seasons. Against the Orioles last week, he had a 2-0 lead in the ninth inning with one man on and Frank Robinson, Boog Powell and Brooks Robinson coming up. He struck out all three. The shutout was McGlothlin's third straight and fourth of the year, and it gave him a total of 33 scoreless innings in a row, a team record. Angel fans are clamoring for Oriole Manager Hank Bauer to use McGlothlin in the July 11 All-Star Game in Anaheim. "He's got a chance," Bauer says. "You can't pitch any better than he has." Although born in Hollywood, Jim has remained immune to all the glitter. "Mac never puts on airs," says Angel Pitching Coach Bob Lemon. "He isn't temperamental. He's the easiest pitcher to get along with that I've ever known."

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