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Herman Weiskopf
June 26, 1967
When National League Umpire Bob Engel, who was helping out last week at the 21st annual College World Series in Omaha, was asked to compare the collegiate players with major-leaguers, he said, "The college boys have better manners." Those scholarly athletes may have yelled "Take it" instead of "Mine! Mine!" as they circled under pop-ups, but for the most part they played aggressive, forget-about-Emily Post baseball. Consider Ron Davini of Arizona State. He didn't have patience enough to wait politely for the intentional walk being offered by a Stanford pitcher. Instead, he poked at one of the outside pitches designed to put him on first base and hit it for a run-scoring single. Without that run, the Sun Devils might well have lost. As it was, they still had to go 14 innings to eke out a 4-3 victory—Pitcher Gary Gentry scratched an infield hit and scored on a double over the center fielder's head by Scott Reid. Gentry, who struck out 15 batters, won his 16th straight game to bring his season's record to 17-1. The loss eliminated Stanford, pretournament favorite, and moved State into the championship game against Houston. For Arizona State, which lost five of its players to major league clubs following the 1966 season, this was supposed to have been a rebuilding year. For Houston, which does not play baseball on the same big-time, 60-games-a-season scale—and which lost to Stanford 12-1 in the first game of this double-elimination tournament—the final game was the last hurdle on its implausible Cinderella journey. But Arizona State defeated the Cougars 11-2 for its second championship in the past three years.
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June 26, 1967

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When National League Umpire Bob Engel, who was helping out last week at the 21st annual College World Series in Omaha, was asked to compare the collegiate players with major-leaguers, he said, "The college boys have better manners." Those scholarly athletes may have yelled "Take it" instead of "Mine! Mine!" as they circled under pop-ups, but for the most part they played aggressive, forget-about- Emily Post baseball. Consider Ron Davini of Arizona State. He didn't have patience enough to wait politely for the intentional walk being offered by a Stanford pitcher. Instead, he poked at one of the outside pitches designed to put him on first base and hit it for a run-scoring single. Without that run, the Sun Devils might well have lost. As it was, they still had to go 14 innings to eke out a 4-3 victory—Pitcher Gary Gentry scratched an infield hit and scored on a double over the center fielder's head by Scott Reid. Gentry, who struck out 15 batters, won his 16th straight game to bring his season's record to 17-1. The loss eliminated Stanford, pretournament favorite, and moved State into the championship game against Houston. For Arizona State, which lost five of its players to major league clubs following the 1966 season, this was supposed to have been a rebuilding year. For Houston, which does not play baseball on the same big-time, 60-games-a-season scale—and which lost to Stanford 12-1 in the first game of this double-elimination tournament—the final game was the last hurdle on its implausible Cinderella journey. But Arizona State defeated the Cougars 11-2 for its second championship in the past three years.

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