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A side-door entrance to the major leagues
Leonard Shecter
July 17, 1967
Dave Baldwin of Washington was a study in futility until the day he developed a peculiar sidearm delivery. Since then he has been a superspecialist, a right-handed reliever who pitches only to right-handed batters
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July 17, 1967

A Side-door Entrance To The Major Leagues

Dave Baldwin of Washington was a study in futility until the day he developed a peculiar sidearm delivery. Since then he has been a superspecialist, a right-handed reliever who pitches only to right-handed batters

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"It's not so bad," Diane said. "We enjoy each other's company. We could have a TV if we wanted it, but there just isn't that much worth watching."

Baldwin decided that if he were ever going to make it to the major leagues, he would have to do something different. He began to experiment. Working on a slider, he found that he had better control and was more effective if he dropped his arm before he let it go. "It was mostly serendipity," he said. "I dropped my arm lower, and pretty soon I was throwing a sidearm curve. It worked better than the slider."

He had the best year of his career with Burlington that year, finishing 12-3 with 135 strikeouts and a more than respectable 2.43 ERA. Then it was two pretty good years in Hawaii and, at last—at the end of 1966—to the Senators. Still last place, but last place in the big leagues. His salary is still low—only $7,500—but it is enough to afford the Baldwins a cozy apartment just outside Washington, D.C. They now have steak once in a while, and they haven't seen a centipede yet.

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