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A roundup of the sports information of the week
July 31, 1967
BOATING—The observation trials, a preliminary in picking a defender for the America's Cup next month, came to a close with only six days of racing (due to poor weather conditions) over the 13-day period. Skippered by Bus Mosbacher, INTREPID, the new, sleek 12-meter wonder, remained unbeaten in all her six races and now looks forward to the final trials in three weeks, along with 1964 cup winner Constellation, and California's rebuilt 1958 champion, Columbia (each with three wins, three losses). The fourth boat, American Eagle, lost six races and went back into the yard for modifications.
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July 31, 1967

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BOATING—The observation trials, a preliminary in picking a defender for the America's Cup next month, came to a close with only six days of racing (due to poor weather conditions) over the 13-day period. Skippered by Bus Mosbacher, INTREPID, the new, sleek 12-meter wonder, remained unbeaten in all her six races and now looks forward to the final trials in three weeks, along with 1964 cup winner Constellation, and California's rebuilt 1958 champion, Columbia (each with three wins, three losses). The fourth boat, American Eagle, lost six races and went back into the yard for modifications.

Alfred E. Stern Jr.'s Columbia-50 sloop, DIABLO, seventh boat to cross the finish line at Mackinac Island, Mich., took top honors and the Division I prize over a record fleet of 168 entries with a corrected time of 39:32.23 in the 60th annual Chicago-Mackinac yacht race.

With California's 22-year-old Skip Allan at the helm, his family's Cal-40 sloop, Holiday Too, sailed to an overall first place in the 24th biennial Transpacific Los Angeles- Honolulu race with a corrected time of 8:19:46:46.

BOWLING—ED TAKACS, a 36-year-old salesman from Cleveland, took top prize of $32,000 in the $491,000 Petersen Classic in Chicago—richest of all bowling tournaments. He rolled an eight-game total of 1,678, five pins better than Jerry Farrow of Philadelphia.

BOXING—Third-ranked heavyweight contender JOE FRAZIER, 23, of Philadelphia, added one more victory to his siring of 16 and remained unbeaten as he scored a fourth-round TKO over Canadian George Chuvalo, 29, in a scheduled 12-rounder at New York's Madison Square Garden (page 26).

CYCLING—France's 27-year-old ROGER PINGEON led from the fifth leg of the 22-day Tour de France Alpine endurance race and pedaled to a 136:53:50 victory, only 3:40 in front of the celebrated Spaniard, Julio Jiminez.

GOLF—Dallas' DON JANUARY outshot fellow Texan Don Massengale by two strokes for a 69 to win a playoff for the PGA Championship at the Columbine Country Club in Denver, Colo. (page 18).

Former National Open Champion CAROL MANN moved to the top of the LPGA money-winning list when she defeated Aussie Margie Masters by two strokes with a 54-hole total of 210 at the $18,000 Supertest Open in London, Ont. Defending Champion Kathy Whitworth finished third with 213.

HARNESS RACING—"We were lucky," said Driver Harry Pownall, after guiding 15-to-1-shot POMP ($33.20) to victory through a congested field of 13 in the one-mile, $150,000 Yonkers Futurity—the initial leg of the Triple Crown of trotting—by three lengths over Dazzling Speed (page 48).

HORSE RACING—Taking full advantage of Buck-passer's 136-pound top weight, Hobeau Farm's HANDSOME BOY ($12.60), at 116 with Eddie Belmonte aboard, scored his second major victory in eight days with an eight-length upset over the 1966 Horse of the Year in the $106,700 Brooklyn Handicap at Aqueduct. The winning time of 2:00[1/5] for the 1�-mile race—the final leg of the handicap Triple Crown—missed the track record by only [3/5] second.

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