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A SPLASH OF RESORT DASH
August 21, 1967
Bill Blass, the man responsible for the sports clothes worn here by Southampton resorters on a Long Island weekend, has long been known as one of America's best designers of women's clothes. But this fall, for Pincus Brothers-Maxwell, he has turned his hand to designing country clothes for sportsmen, clothes that have the kind of individuality heretofore difficult to find outside a custom tailor shop. Blass has taken classic menswear fabrics, such as twill, tweed, corduroy and camel's hair, and given them a new look by using bold colors, bold patterns and emphatic shaping of jackets. He had Italian wide-wale corduroy made on the bias to give it a whipcord effect. He has turned English and Scottish district checks, the boldest available, into jackets and slacks that are meant to be bought and worn together as country suits or separately. Everything mixes or matches. There are two very good jacket cuts—the wide-lapel, two-button model (left) and the six-button double-breasted blazer (right). The accessories designed to go with them are equally bold. Ties are bright-colored cashmere and challis. Wool turtleneck shirts have eight-inch collars which turn over high under the chin. Dress shirts, also high on the neck with widespread collars, come in strong tones of blue, green, brown, red and orange. There are country raincoats with unusual flair (following pages) meant to be worn with matching rain pants. The collection gives the man over 30 a chance to dress with as much mix-or-match dash as he dares.
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August 21, 1967

A Splash Of Resort Dash

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Bill Blass, the man responsible for the sports clothes worn here by Southampton resorters on a Long Island weekend, has long been known as one of America's best designers of women's clothes. But this fall, for Pincus Brothers-Maxwell, he has turned his hand to designing country clothes for sportsmen, clothes that have the kind of individuality heretofore difficult to find outside a custom tailor shop. Blass has taken classic menswear fabrics, such as twill, tweed, corduroy and camel's hair, and given them a new look by using bold colors, bold patterns and emphatic shaping of jackets. He had Italian wide-wale corduroy made on the bias to give it a whipcord effect. He has turned English and Scottish district checks, the boldest available, into jackets and slacks that are meant to be bought and worn together as country suits or separately. Everything mixes or matches. There are two very good jacket cuts—the wide-lapel, two-button model (left) and the six-button double-breasted blazer (right). The accessories designed to go with them are equally bold. Ties are bright-colored cashmere and challis. Wool turtleneck shirts have eight-inch collars which turn over high under the chin. Dress shirts, also high on the neck with widespread collars, come in strong tones of blue, green, brown, red and orange. There are country raincoats with unusual flair (following pages) meant to be worn with matching rain pants. The collection gives the man over 30 a chance to dress with as much mix-or-match dash as he dares.

ON HER SOUTHAMPTON DECK MRS. BRUCE ADDISON, IN BLASS AT-HOME OUTFIT, ENTERTAINS MITIA GUERRINI-MARALDI AND RICHARD HARRIS, WHO MIX PATTERNED SLACKS WITH CORDUROY BLAZERS. BUD HOLMAN (LEFT) ON A DOG WALK IN THE SHINNECOCK HILLS MATCHES TWEED JACKET AND SLACKS TO FORM A COUNTRY SUIT.

RAIN CLOTHES BY BLASS KEEP ONE DRY IN STYLE. TONY VAN GONSIC (FAR LEFT) WEARS A BELTED PADDOCK COAT; BUD HOLMAN'S IS COPIED FROM A SCOTTISH SHOOTING JACKET. BOTH HAVE MATCHING RAIN PANTS. KATHERINE GILL IS EQUALLY RAINPROOF WEARING AN ARGYLE COAT WITH MATCHING CAP AND BOOTS.

WHERE TO BUY BLASS
The entire Bill Blass for PBM fall menswear collection will be at Bonwit Teller, New York; Halle Bros., Cleveland; Hughes & Hatcher, Pittsburgh and Detroit; Wanamaker's, Philadelphia. The tweed jackets, such as the one Bud Holman wears on the opening page, are $110. The slacks, which can be purchased to make up a suit or worn separately, are $45. Shirts, in many colors, are $18.50. The six-button corduroy blazers worn by Mitia Guerrini-Maraldi and Richard Harris on the second page are $100. Checked and tartan slacks are $45. Wool turtleneck shirts, with unusually high necks, are $37.50. The men's raincoats at left are $95, the rain pants $27.50. The women's clothes on these pages are by Bill Blass for Maurice Rentner.

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