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Old and new pool their talent
Kim Chapin
August 21, 1967
Yale man Don Schollander (left) has mellowed, but not so much that he can't respond to the challenge of brilliant newcomer Mark Spitz
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August 21, 1967

Old And New Pool Their Talent

Yale man Don Schollander (left) has mellowed, but not so much that he can't respond to the challenge of brilliant newcomer Mark Spitz

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Schollander's record was one of only three world standards that fell during the three-day meet—surprisingly, since most of the swimmers had geared their training toward it. Another came in the 1,500-meter freestyle when Mike Burton of the Arden Hills ( Calif.) swim team churned the 30 grueling lengths in 16:34.1, chopping 7� seconds off his own world mark. In this meet last year he lowered the record by 17 seconds. Burton's latest mark was set without benefit of any sort of pace. "I like to get out front myself," he said. "Then I can set my own." The third record came when Greg Buckingham of Santa Clara Swim Club lowered his own world mark in the 200-meter individual medley by 1.1 seconds.

The rest of the meet produced many exciting, close and competitive races but few surprises. Spitz, of course, won both butterfly events. Charles Hickcox of the Indiana Aquatic Club won both backstroke events, and the other freestyle race went to Greg Charlton of the Los Angeles Athletic Club (400 meters). Charlton, ironically, is from Schollander's home town of Lake Oswego, Ore.

The race for team honors gave Santa Clara Coach George Haines a few anxious moments. After the first day Santa Clara trailed Peter Daland's Los Angeles Club by 10 points. But its own depth gave Santa Clara its fourth straight title. Of course, a telegram from the Santa Clara girl swimmers, who will compete in and probably dominate this week's women's nationals in Philadelphia, helped. It read: GET YOUR REARS IN GEAR. The boys did.

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