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THE BIG ONES SCOUTS ARE WATCHING
September 11, 1967
Here are five sparkling sophomores, and the 90 college players that the pros rank as the best
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September 11, 1967

The Big Ones Scouts Are Watching

Here are five sparkling sophomores, and the 90 college players that the pros rank as the best

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THE PROS' PRESEASON PICKS FOR ALL-AMERICA

Before the action starts, pro scouts have a good idea of which players they want to
follow most closely. Below, compiled from information assembled by NFL and AFL
talent hunters, are this fall's finest prospects, listed under their likely pro positions.

OFFENSE

DEFENSE

QUARTERBACKS

SAFETIES

GARY BEBAN, UCLA
DAN HOLMAN, San Jose State
KEN STABLER, Alabama
BILLY STEVENS, Texas, El Paso
DEWEY WARREN, Tennessee

LOU HARRIS, Kent State
JIMJANCIK, Tulane
FRANK LORIA, Virginia Tech
TOM SCHOEN, Notre Dame
CHARLIE WEST, Texas, El Paso

RUNNING BACKS

HALFBACKS

LARRY CSONKA, Syracuse
GARRETT FORD, West Virginia
CHRIS GILBERT, Texas
BEN GREGORY, Nebraska
RONNIE JENKINS, Georgia
JIM KIICK, Wyoming
WARREN McVEA Houston
OSCAR REED Colorado State
LARRY SMITH, Florida
LEE WHITE, Weber State

BOBBY DUHON, Tulane
MAJORHAZELTON, Florida A&M
BOBBY JOHNS, Alabama
LEROY KEYES, Purdue
ED MANTIE, Syracuse
JESSE PHILLIPS, Michigan State
PETE RICHARDSON, Dayton
JIM SMITH, Oregon
JIM SMITHBERGER, Notre Dame
TOM TRANTHAM, Arkansas

FLANKERS AND SPLIT' ENDS

LINEBACKERS

JIM COX, Miami ( Fla.)
DAVID DICKEY, Arkansas
RICHMOND FLOWERS, Tennessee
KEN HEBERT, Houston
DENNIS HOMAN, Alabama
HAVEN MOSES, San Diego State
RON SELLERS, Florida State
JIM SEYMOUR, Notre Dame
BOB WALLACE Texas El Paso
JOHN WRIGHT, Illinois

RANDY BEHRINGER, Baylor
JOEL BRAME, Texas
FRED CARR, Texas, El Paso
KEN CORBIN, Miami ( Fla.)
MIKE HALL, Alabama
ED HARMON, Louisville
MIKE McGILL, Notre Dame
MIKE REID, Penn State
NICK SHOWALTER, Tennessee
ADRIAN YOUNG, USC

TIGHT ENDS

ENDS

KEN BAREFOOT, Virginia Tech
RICH O'HARA, Northern Arizona
CHARLIE SANDERS, Minnesota
THURSTON TAYLOR, Florida St.
JIM ZAMBERLAN, Louisville

JOE BLAKE, Tulsa
JOHN GARLINGTON, LSU
BOB GRANT, Wake Forest
TED HENDRICKS, Miami ( Fla.)
CORBY ROBERTSON, Texas

INTERIOR LINEMEN

INTERIOR LINEMEN

DANNY ABBOTT, Texas
EDGAR CHANDLER, Georgia
MIKE EVANS, Boston College
DICK HIMES. Ohio State
BOB JOHNSON, Tennessee
BILL LENKAITIS, Penn State
ROLF KRUEGER Texas A&M
WAYNE MASS Clemson
MAURICE MOORMAN T. A&M
RAY PHILLIPS, Michigan
JOE PRZYBYCKI, Michigan State
ERNEST RUPLE, Arkansas
RICH STOTTFR, Houston
JOHN WILLIAMS, Minnesota
RON YARY, USC

ELVIN BETHEA, N. Carolina A&T
DENNIS BYRD, N. Carolina State
DOUG CRUSAN, Indiana
CURLEY CULP, Arizona State
MIKE DIRKS, Wyoming
KEVIN HARDY, Notre Dame
CLAUDE HUMPHREY Tenn. St.
GRANVILLE LIGGINS, Oklahoma
WAYNE MEYLAN, Nebraska
BLAINE NYE, Stanford
DAN SARTIN, Mississippi
BILL STALEY, Utah State
BILL STANFILL, Georgia
JIM URBANEK, Mississippi
RUSS WASHINGTON, Missouri

Just about this time each fall America's less fortunate football coaches may be found slouched in their office chairs, staring glaze-eyed through a window at a stadium soon to be bursting with pennant-waving, victory-hungry alumni. At intervals they shudder. It is safe to guess that they are shuddering at the thought of the opening game. The thought shapes up like this: "They'll never understand. They just don't realize how much experience we've lost. Twenty-two lettermen—and who's going to be playing in their places? Who's going to be my quarterback and my defensive ends? Sophomores! That's who. Sophomores..." Yes, it is usually the sophomores who bring a coach's heart to his throat with those off-target blocks, line-drive punts and long, wobbly passes. But still each year there are an exciting few newcomers who play football as if they were born in the bright new game jerseys that they are wearing for the first time. Here are five of this year's very special sophomores.

GLEN HALSELL, TEXAS

Darrell Royal can't wait to turn Linebacker Glen Halsell loose against USC so that Halsell can start knocking enemy heads together instead of those of his teammates. A stubby 200-pounder, Halsell is in the tradition of the great Longhorn linebackers of the past. "You sort of feel 'em behind you," says Halsell. "Pat Culpepper, Timmy Doerr, Nobis, Edwards...Ever since I got here the idea kept pushing me that I was filling some mighty big shoes."

Halsell, just like Joel Brame, who will play alongside him, has an insatiable desire to ram his head between the jersey numbers of anybody carrying a football. "You got to be tough," Halsell says. "I mean, really think about it. Joel is my idol. Against Rice last year he got his nose laid open to the bone, but he never came out of the game. It was so bad he's going to need plastic surgery."

Halsell, who comes from Odessa, Texas, has a neck that measures 17� inches, � la Tommy Nobis, and has been clocked in 5.7 seconds for the 50-yard dash. The only thing he must learn is patience. Sometimes he is too anxious to get into the action. "The hardest thing for me is playing my position," he says. "I can't go running off after the ball until I'm sure what's going to happen." Royal doesn't seem too worried about that.

RICH SAUL, MICHIGAN STATE

There are certain uniform numbers that Ken Earley, the Michigan State equipment manager, hoards until somebody special comes along. Numbers like 14 (Billy Wells, Lynn Chandnois) and 26 (Clarence Peaks, Herb Adderley, Clinton Jones). You don't give them out to just anybody. No. 88 is one of those numbers. In past years it has been worn by Bob Carey and Sammy Williams, both All-Americas. This fall it will go to Rich Saul, a 6'3", 222-pound defensive end whom Duffy Daugherty says is the best sophomore he has ever had at Michigan State. This is quite a thing to say, but Saul is quite a thing to say it about.

Saul comes from the right background to merit such esteem. His big brother, Bill, was an All-America at Penn State and now plays for the Pittsburgh Steelers. Twin brother Ron is a promising guard for the Spartans. The thing they all do best is hit, and Rich looks like the family slugging champion.

Saul was a teammate of Terry Hanratty's at Butler High School in Pennsylvania and. while Butler was winning 26 of 27 games during his three years at end, he made All-State and High School All-America twice. College scouts clustered around the Saul house like so many 'Bama linebackers after a ballcarrier, but by the time Rich was one of the outstanding players in the Texas-Pennsylvania high school All-Star game he had decided upon Michigan State. He was co-captain of the MSU freshman team last year, made a fine showing throughout the spring and next week will be the only sophomore in the starting lineup as the Spartans open against Houston, whose All-America halfback, Warren McVea, will quickly test how good he really is. "Rich can do it all," says Cal Stoll, an MSU assistant, sounding like every coach who ever touted a sophomore whiz. But this time the assessment may be right.

VINCE OPALSKY, MIAMI
Sixty colleges thought Vince Opalsky was going to be a spectacular running back someday, and now Miami is ready to enjoy the reason why. Head Coach Charlie Tate has tried to soften the publicity buildup around his 6'2", 208-pound halfback, admitting only that "Vince has all the tools," but if the freshmen games are any indication, Hurricane opponents will be in for some rough evenings in the Orange Bowl. In four games last fall Opalsky carried for more yards (514) than any varsity regular did in 10 games, and already he is being compared to Don Bosseler, the Miami All-America who wound up with the Washington Redskins. At Serra Catholic High in McKeesport, Pa., Opalsky scored almost 300 points in three years and ran for more than 2,500 yards. He had a chance to go to Notre Dame but turned it down. "I figured I'd be just another number," he says. "I didn't have confidence then." But after a Miami recruiter watched Opalsky go 70 yards for a touchdown in his last high school game, he burst into the dressing room and cried. "Vince, that was a $12,000 run. That's what it will cost us to put you through Miami." It looks like money well spent

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