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HIGHLIGHT
Herman Weiskopf
September 25, 1967
"People kept asking me, 'Why don't you have an interesting pennant race like they do in the National League?' " says Bob Holbrook, who became publicity director of the American League in 1966. The question was usually asked in jest, but it was asked so frequently that it began to irritate the easygoing Holbrook. "It bugged the devil out of me," he says. But now all that has changed. The American League race has been nothing but excitement, no one asks that question anymore, and Holbrook is happy. One of the things that has helped make this such a resounding pennant brawl has been the extraordinary resiliency of the four contending clubs—their ability to fight back and win games in the late innings. Minnesota has come from behind in the seventh inning or later to win 30 games, Chicago 27, Boston 23, Detroit 16. Moreover, the White Sox have won in their final at bat on 19 occasions. The Twins held first place for most of August largely because they won 11 such come-from-behind games that month. The Tigers did it four times in 11 days this month, and last week the White Sox did it three times in four days. Last Friday a three-run homer by Bill Freehan in the eighth brought the Tigers into a 4-4 tie with the Senators, and then, with two on and two out in the ninth, Willie Horton came up. Given a life when his foul pop was misplayed, Horton drove in the winning run to move the Tigers into a three-way tie for the league lead. In Chicago the next night the White Sox went into the ninth trailing 4-1 and, with Dean Chance pitching for the Twins, seemed doomed. But they came up with one of their patented rallies—two walks, an error, a wild pitch, a sacrifice fly and four singles, including a game-winner by Pete Ward (right)—to take the game. With just a game separating the four clubs, and only two weeks to go in the season, Bob Holbrook said, "It's a delightful situation."
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September 25, 1967

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"People kept asking me, 'Why don't you have an interesting pennant race like they do in the National League?' " says Bob Holbrook, who became publicity director of the American League in 1966. The question was usually asked in jest, but it was asked so frequently that it began to irritate the easygoing Holbrook. "It bugged the devil out of me," he says. But now all that has changed. The American League race has been nothing but excitement, no one asks that question anymore, and Holbrook is happy. One of the things that has helped make this such a resounding pennant brawl has been the extraordinary resiliency of the four contending clubs—their ability to fight back and win games in the late innings. Minnesota has come from behind in the seventh inning or later to win 30 games, Chicago 27, Boston 23, Detroit 16. Moreover, the White Sox have won in their final at bat on 19 occasions. The Twins held first place for most of August largely because they won 11 such come-from-behind games that month. The Tigers did it four times in 11 days this month, and last week the White Sox did it three times in four days. Last Friday a three-run homer by Bill Freehan in the eighth brought the Tigers into a 4-4 tie with the Senators, and then, with two on and two out in the ninth, Willie Horton came up. Given a life when his foul pop was misplayed, Horton drove in the winning run to move the Tigers into a three-way tie for the league lead. In Chicago the next night the White Sox went into the ninth trailing 4-1 and, with Dean Chance pitching for the Twins, seemed doomed. But they came up with one of their patented rallies—two walks, an error, a wild pitch, a sacrifice fly and four singles, including a game-winner by Pete Ward (right)—to take the game. With just a game separating the four clubs, and only two weeks to go in the season, Bob Holbrook said, "It's a delightful situation."

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