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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
September 25, 1967
KICKOFFSirs:Compliments are in order for Dan Jenkins for his fine article about the opening college football season (This Year the Fight Will Be in the Open, Sept. 11) and for his correct prediction of the No. 1 team, the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame.JERRY SHEARD Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
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September 25, 1967

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Sirs:
When was the Yankee Conference disbanded?
LIEUT. JG MICHAEL FIRST, USN
Norfolk, Va.

Sirs:
Thanks for a great look at college football! Behind the backfield are the fans, and they can tell you a thousand reasons why "their" team is tops. It is difficult to rate teams and keep everybody happy but, thanks to SI, readers have an inside look on who to watch and why.
DEBBIE FLEINER
Burbank, Calif.

INTERCEPTED PASS
Sirs:
In your September 11 college football issue it was stated that Terry Hanratty can throw a 50-yard pass "without letting it rise more than 10 feet off the ground." If you assume that he releases the ball at the goal line from a point 6� feet above the ground and merely hits the 50-yard line without allowing the ball to rise higher than 10 feet—and even neglect air resistance—then the ball still must be thrown at 255 mph at an angle of 7� to the horizontal. This is more than twice the speed that anyone has ever thrown anything. Please try to stick to meaningful assertions and let Notre Dame's performance attest to its players' superhuman capabilities.
BILL SHANKS
East Lansing, Mich.

? Terry Hanratty throws hard, but not that hard.—ED.

CURVE BALL
Sirs:
Curry Kirkpatrick's appraisal of Stratford, Conn.'s Raybestos Brakettes gave long-overdue recognition to the headline-starved sport of women's Softball (Nobody Beats the Brakettes, Sept. 11). I know of no other set of athletes who exhibit the bubbling enthusiasm and pure, heartfelt love for their sport that the girl softballers do. However, the author made one generalization that was, I feel, completely unwarranted. He says that "there isn't much girl watching at a women's Softball game," and he scorns authority Morris Bealle's statement that many girl softball players "could enter any beauty contest in the land and finish in the upper brackets." I wonder what Mr. Kirkpatrick has to say now that Debra Dene Barnes, a beautiful first basewoman from Kansas, has been crowned Miss America of 1968.
MARK MANDEL
Portland, Ore.

FROM THE BOOK
Sirs:
Jack Nicklaus is a very heavy-handed rules man. Would he really charge two strokes if my ball moved accidentally after address (Standing Firm in the Pines, Sept. 11)? I would argue with him. Rule 27:1c calls for a one-stroke penalty.
JOSEPH C. DEY JR.
New York City

? Mr. Dey, Executive Director of the USGA, is one stroke up on SI.—ED.

BUCKEYE FEVER
Sirs:
What a delightful, nostalgic story for every Buckeye scattered throughout the land (Say It Isn't So, Woody, Sept. 11)! There were only three bits of memorabilia Robert Cantwell omitted that must be included in any history of Ohio State: 1) the year Maudine Ormsby, a cow, ran for Homecoming Queen; 2) the OSU-Notre Dame game of 1935, which Notre Dame won by two touchdowns in two minutes; and 3) the famous dressing-room statement by one of our coaches, Francis Schmidt, that Michigan players were just like any other men—they put on their pants one leg at a time!
R. SPRAGUE
Fayetteville, N.C.

Sirs:
After having read the article Say It Isn't So, Woody, I am very proud to be a coed at Ohio State University, and I am also very proud to be a grade-A fan of the Buckeyes. I am sure that your story brought many tears to the eyes of alumni, who fondly remember walks by Mirror Lake and Saturday football contests in the horseshoe stadium. It is hard to put into words the excitement that can be felt on a football weekend in Columbus, but your article did it! Incidentally, our victory bell is located in the southeast tower of the stadium and not in Orton Tower. The latter bells are located on the Oval, and ring out with the time.
LIBBY HOLMAN
Worthington, Ohio

Sirs:
Your excellent article on Ohio State football overlooked one very important example of the de-emphasis of football at Ohio State. Although all Big Ten schools have been permitted to play 10 games a season for the past several years, Ohio State has never scheduled more than nine games—the only Big Ten school to do so. This was an administration decision—one that obviously costs the school another 80,000 crowd, or some $100,000 in revenue. But it was decided that the academic stature was more important.
JAMES J. BEHR
Cincinnati

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