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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
December 04, 1967
ACHTUNG!Sirs:My attention has been called to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED'S recent full-page advertisement in The New York Times, and I am surprised to note that the author of this advertisement apparently does not know that Hitler could not and did not "change Olympic ritual." Only the International Olympic Committee can alter Olympic rules and regulations. As a matter of fact, it was the IOC that changed Hitler.
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December 04, 1967

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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ACHTUNG!
Sirs:
My attention has been called to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED'S recent full-page advertisement in The New York Times, and I am surprised to note that the author of this advertisement apparently does not know that Hitler could not and did not "change Olympic ritual." Only the International Olympic Committee can alter Olympic rules and regulations. As a matter of fact, it was the IOC that changed Hitler.

The initial competition in the Berlin Games in 1936 was won by a German. It was the first time in the history of the Games that an Olympic track-and-field event had been won by a German athlete, and the excitement among the 100,000 spectators, including Hitler, may easily be imagined. Officials of the German team rushed the new champion to Hitler's box for congratulations.

That evening Hitler received a message from the Count de Baillet-Latour, president of the IOC, stating that demonstrations of this sort were not appropriate at the Olympic Games and specifying that unless Hitler wanted to congratulate every victorious athlete such demonstrations must be discontinued. There was no repetition. Moreover, this was neither the first nor the only time that Hitler was forced to defer to the International Olympic Committee.
AVFRY BRUNDAGE
President, Comit� International
Olympique
Chicago

NO SYMPATHY
Sirs:
Tex Maule certainly picked the wrong opponent in the Redskins for his highlighting of the misfortunes of the San Francisco team (Just Too Sophisticated to Win, Nov. 20). Our 'Skins have lost three close ball games this fall—to the likes of the Cowboys, Colts and Cardinals—by a total of only 13 points, and they have been tied by Atlanta and Los Angeles, all within the last moments! Most of these losses have been suffered without the benefit of the most exciting split end in pro football, Charley Taylor, the sure foot of Charlie Gogolak or the defensive leadership of Sam Huff and big rookie Fullback Ray McDonald.

San Francisco's "frustrating history of sorrows," indeed!
JACK LINDEN
Washington

Sirs:
In his article about the 49ers' recent 31-28 loss to the Redskins, Tex Maule dismisses the 'Skins as being "not too potent." I would remind Mr. Maule that, despite a mediocre record, the 'Skins have been ahead of every opponent but one this season going into the fourth quarter. Dallas beat them 17-14 in the last 10 seconds; the Colts edged them out 17-13, with less than two minutes to go; the vaunted Rams were lucky to tie them 28-28 in the closing seconds; and the 20-20 tie with Atlanta was the result of a missed extra point.

Sonny Jurgensen has been the No. 1 passer in the NFL for a good part of the season, and receivers Smith, Mitchell and Taylor currently rank second, fourth and fifth in receptions. Kicker Charlie Gogolak (third in scoring in 1966) has been out the entire season. Charley Taylor (first in pass receiving in 1966) has missed one third of the games because of an injury. Sam Huff is still out from a severe sprain. The club has been plagued by injuries but, despite all this, the 'Skins rank sixth in the NFL in total offense.

Ask Dallas or Los Angeles what they think of the Redskins. I'll guarantee they'll tell you there are many other teams they would rather face than the "not too potent" entry from Washington.
STEVEN C. BERNARD
Rockville, Md.

Sirs:
I know the real trouble with the 49ers. The team has no running game at all. In the backfield Willard and Crow are like the Bobbsey Twins. They both lack the main essentials of a good runner in professional football, power and good speed. Crow has been one of football's best players, but time has finally caught up with his legs.

The 49ers have part of the answer sitting on their bench in the person of second-string Fullback Gary Lewis. In nine games this year Willard rushed for 365 yards in 123 carries for an average of 2.9 yards per carry. His longest run was for 19 yards. Lewis carried the ball 40 times and rushed for 219 yards for an average of 5.4 yards per carry. Gary's longest run was for 52 yards. Also, if you have seen this big back in action you would say that he has the potential to become one of professional football's great backs.
ROBERT RIZZO
San Francisco

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