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A roundup of the sports information of the week
June 10, 1968
BASEBALL—Franchises were awarded by the National League to SAN DIEGO and MONTREAL. Both will commence to play next season, the West Coast club in a new 45,000-seat park, the Canadian team in Autostade (Expo Stadium), where the seating capacity will be upped from 25,000 to 40,000 and where the club will compete until a proposed 55,000-seat domed stadium is opened, hopefully in 1971. Thus the National League and the American League, which granted franchises to Kansas City and Seattle last fall, will have 12 teams each next season. The American, however, will be divided next year into East and West divisions of six teams each and will play 156 games. There will be a playoff between the two winners to determine who will face the champion of the National, which will play either 162 or 165 games but will not split into two halves. Under its realignment, the American League's eastern division will consist of Baltimore, Boston, Cleveland, Detroit, New York and Washington, while the western division will be comprised of California, Chicago, Kansas City, Minnesota, Oakland and Seattle.
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June 10, 1968

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BASEBALL—Franchises were awarded by the National League to SAN DIEGO and MONTREAL. Both will commence to play next season, the West Coast club in a new 45,000-seat park, the Canadian team in Autostade (Expo Stadium), where the seating capacity will be upped from 25,000 to 40,000 and where the club will compete until a proposed 55,000-seat domed stadium is opened, hopefully in 1971. Thus the National League and the American League, which granted franchises to Kansas City and Seattle last fall, will have 12 teams each next season. The American, however, will be divided next year into East and West divisions of six teams each and will play 156 games. There will be a playoff between the two winners to determine who will face the champion of the National, which will play either 162 or 165 games but will not split into two halves. Under its realignment, the American League's eastern division will consist of Baltimore, Boston, Cleveland, Detroit, New York and Washington, while the western division will be comprised of California, Chicago, Kansas City, Minnesota, Oakland and Seattle.

BOATING—The new and ultra-safe hydroplane Smirnoff (page 65) remained upright, but failed to qualify for the finals of the Dixie Cup race in Guntersville, Ala., where MISS EAGLE ELECTRIC, driven by Warner Gardner and owned by Dave Heerensperger of Spokane, was the winner.

BOXING—LEOTIS MARTIN of Philadelphia floored Thad Spencer of San Francisco twice en route to scoring a TKO at 2:28 of the ninth round of their heavyweight fight in London.

GOLF—BOB LUNN of Sacramento, who had not won a tournament until this month, made it two in a row with a 72-hole total of 280, which was good for $23,000 first-place money and a three-stroke margin over Lee Trevino.

HORSE RACING—The Belmont Stakes was won by STAGE DOOR JOHNNY ($10.80), a 1�-length victory over Forward Pass (page 32).

Johnny Rotz rode IN REALITY ($3.20) to a 1�-length victory over Advocator in the $107,900 Metropolitan Handicap at Belmont.

The $134,700 Jersey Derby at Garden State was taken by OUT OF THE WAY ($14.20), who finished 2� lengths in front of Captain's Gig, who, in turn, was a neck ahead of favored Iron Ruler.

Sir Ivor, an American-bred colt owned by U.S. Ambassador to Ireland Raymond Guest and ridden by Lester Piggott, won the $210,360 Epsom Derby by 1� lengths over Connaught.

In another race at Epsom Downs, the English Oaks was won by 11-to-8 favorite LA LAGUNE, a French filly owned by Henri Berlin and trained by Fran�ois Boutin, who beat Irish-trained Glad One by five lengths.

MOTOR SPORTS—BOBBY UNSER of Albuquerque finished first in the Indianapolis 500 with a record average speed of 152.882 mph (page 34).

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