SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
June 10, 1968
CONCERNED ATHLETESSirs:Although my name is the same, I am not a relative of John McCormick and can comment objectively on his article, Score One for Today's Students (May 20). Sports certainly have "become a normal, natural part of life." No longer are athletes a unique and separated group as they were in the '30s. The term "jock" no longer possesses the derogatory implication it once had. The "middle-of-the-road" opinions are no longer acceptable on today's campuses and, as Mr. McCormick so superbly points out, the modern athlete is no longer a middle-of-the-roader.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
June 10, 1968

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

CONCERNED ATHLETES
Sirs:
Although my name is the same, I am not a relative of John McCormick and can comment objectively on his article, Score One for Today's Students (May 20). Sports certainly have "become a normal, natural part of life." No longer are athletes a unique and separated group as they were in the '30s. The term "jock" no longer possesses the derogatory implication it once had. The "middle-of-the-road" opinions are no longer acceptable on today's campuses and, as Mr. McCormick so superbly points out, the modern athlete is no longer a middle-of-the-roader.

I'm sure that there are many other student-athletes like myself who have been subjected to a certain amount of tension in wanting to be active in sports and yet fearful of being stereotyped, with a resultant loss of personal identity and ideas. It is refreshing and reassuring to know there are intuitive people like Professor McCormick who realize that athletes are not all of the same mind and mold.

Thank you very much for such an excellent appraisal of a current situation.
ANDREW McCORMICK
Brighton, Mass.

Sirs:
Congratulations to you and thanks to Professor McCormick. His article brought back much more than just our "left-wing," "egghead" view of sports. I had almost forgotten the feeling of college and lost causes in the late '30s and very early '40s.

Professor McCormick was so right about the underlying respect we gave to football in those times, despite our disclaimer. In looking back, I realize that the major reason for my pursuing graduate work at Cornell in 1945 was its Big Red reputation before World War II.
STEVEN E. SCHANES
Academic Dean
University of San Diego
San Diego

THE MASTER BOB
Sirs:
Your article on Bob Goalby (The New Life of Bob Goalby, May 27) is a well-put, well-timed, well-deserved defense of one of the finest veteran touring pros in America today.

On Wednesday, April 3 Bob was subjected to me as a partner for 18 rainy holes in the Pro-Am at the Greensboro Open. He was courteous and considerate as well as patient!

Congratulations to Bob Goalby, the Masters Champion for 1968, and congratulations to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED for recognizing him as such!
JAMES HEDGPETH
Concord, N.C.

Sirs:
I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate Dan Jenkins on his fine article on Bob Goalby, not because he wrote so many truths about Golfer Goalby winning the Masters (he really did, you know, by shooting great golf), but because Jenkins didn't mention Goalby as the "All-America" quarterback from Illinois. Just for the record, Goalby never played even one minute of varsity football for the U. of Ill. Goalby came to the Illini as an 11-letter athlete but dropped out after completing only two semesters, which only goes to prove that some dropouts do make it big.
BOB HANNUM
Lubbock, Texas

THE REVEREND BOB
Sirs:
Congratulations on your article concerning the Rev. Bob Richards, a truly great man (They Cheer When the Parson Is Pitching, May 27). I first met Bob Richards at the concluding ceremonies of the National Junior Track and Field Championships in St. Paul, Minn. It was quite an experience for me to see and talk with him. As a result, I feel fortunate to have been one of the many, many youngsters who have been moved by him and what he stands for.

Continue Story
1 2 3