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Dick Russell
July 01, 1968
Making trouble is Richie Allen's forte. On the field the Phillie slugger has been brewing a storm for opponents ever since he was the league's top rookie in 1964. He is a 26-year-old outfielder-third baseman now, and he has a career average of .310 with 28 home runs and 91 RBIs a season. Such consistency provoked even disgruntled Gene Mauch to say, "I'll vouch this for Allen, from the first pitch till the end of the game nobody plays harder than he does." Mauch, ironically, was fired as the Phils' manager because of his inability to curb Allen's penchant for trouble off the field. It seems that Allen keeps playing hard after the game, too. He has repeatedly missed curfews and, as a result, paid heavy fines out of his $70,000-plus salary. Along the way, he has left most of his teammates dismayed by his behavior and twice has injured himself, once seriously while pushing a jalopy up a hill, recently while riding a horse. New Manager Bob Skinner took up where Mauch left off in speaking of Allen—"He's a tremendous player," Skinner said. "Many managers would love to have him and I'm one of them. I anticipate no trouble at all"—but his bromides seem to have had a positive effect. Allen, suddenly tightly disciplined off the field, has already impressed other Phils with his new concern for the team. At the plate the right-handed slugger clouted two homers and reached base nine consecutive times during a doubleheader last week to start off a streak in which he averaged .478 with six home runs. With that, even Philadelphia's most vociferous booers started cheering. They gave Allen two standing ovations and, in a startling gesture for an old troublemaker, he responded with a gracious tip of his cap.
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July 01, 1968

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Making trouble is Richie Allen's forte. On the field the Phillie slugger has been brewing a storm for opponents ever since he was the league's top rookie in 1964. He is a 26-year-old outfielder-third baseman now, and he has a career average of .310 with 28 home runs and 91 RBIs a season. Such consistency provoked even disgruntled Gene Mauch to say, "I'll vouch this for Allen, from the first pitch till the end of the game nobody plays harder than he does." Mauch, ironically, was fired as the Phils' manager because of his inability to curb Allen's penchant for trouble off the field. It seems that Allen keeps playing hard after the game, too. He has repeatedly missed curfews and, as a result, paid heavy fines out of his $70,000-plus salary. Along the way, he has left most of his teammates dismayed by his behavior and twice has injured himself, once seriously while pushing a jalopy up a hill, recently while riding a horse. New Manager Bob Skinner took up where Mauch left off in speaking of Allen—"He's a tremendous player," Skinner said. "Many managers would love to have him and I'm one of them. I anticipate no trouble at all"—but his bromides seem to have had a positive effect. Allen, suddenly tightly disciplined off the field, has already impressed other Phils with his new concern for the team. At the plate the right-handed slugger clouted two homers and reached base nine consecutive times during a doubleheader last week to start off a streak in which he averaged .478 with six home runs. With that, even Philadelphia's most vociferous booers started cheering. They gave Allen two standing ovations and, in a startling gesture for an old troublemaker, he responded with a gracious tip of his cap.

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