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RUDE WELCOME BACK FOR PAUL
Tex Maule
August 12, 1968
After an absence of five years, Paul Brown returned to pro football last week as coach of the new Cincinnati Bengals and in his first exhibition game discovered that it may be a very long season
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August 12, 1968

Rude Welcome Back For Paul

After an absence of five years, Paul Brown returned to pro football last week as coach of the new Cincinnati Bengals and in his first exhibition game discovered that it may be a very long season

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Stofa, after the scrimmage had ended, was a happy young man. He is dark, tall and rangy, and he had passed well and stood up coolly under the blitzes the defense had thrown at him. On the last play of the scrimmage he had handed off to Tom Smiley, a big fullback from Lamar Tech, and the 235-pound Smiley had rumbled 40 yards for a touchdown. Stofa beamed and called out to Brown.

"If I had known you wanted to quit on a touchdown I'd have called it sooner," he said, grinning. "That was good today. Real good. The fellows didn't make any big mistakes out there and the offensive line was good. It sure felt fine."

Dewey Warren, the rookie quarterback from Tennessee, had looked good, too. He is a sturdy young man, not tall (6 feet) for a quarterback, but husky and courageous.

"He looks them in the eye," Paul Brown said later, relaxing with an orange drink in his conference room. "The players look for that. That's the first thing they notice."

Brown called the scrimmage to a halt after the touchdown. "They had gone about an hour," he said. "They ran about 45 plays. I wanted the offense to get a feeling of accomplishment. That's why we went over every play so carefully in the huddle."

Brown had called the plays and had movies taken of the scrimmage. He called the plays quietly, with the young faces around him intent and listening, then reminded key players what their assignments were. Once he told Smiley, "Look at the linebacker, Tom. Even before you sway, look to see if he's coming. You have to pick him up."

Smiley looked for the linebacker on the play, saw him coming and stood him straight up with a shattering block. He came back to the huddle with a broad grin splitting his face.

"Now, all of this is new to him," Brown explained, sipping his drink. "He didn't have to worry about blitzing linebackers in college. He got as big a kick out of picking up that linebacker as he did from the touchdown." He finished his orange drink and stretched.

"We're all teachers," he said. He held up a thick black notebook. "You have to be. When I came back I got a message from Luke Johnsos, one of the Chicago Bears' assistant coaches. He told a friend of mine, 'You tell Paul the offenses haven't changed much. His problem will be defense.' Well, he was right. The defenses are much more sophisticated—is that the word?—complex, complicated. Whatever you want to call it. This is our defensive book and it's almost as thick as the offensive book. And we've got a bunch of kids from all different systems, using different terminologies and numbering systems being taught by coaches from different systems. It creates some interesting problems."

Brown grinned and did not look at all dismayed by the problems.

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