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HARRY HAS HIS OWN WAYS
Myron Cope
October 07, 1968
Raucous, fun-loving St. Louis broadcaster Harry Caray, whose loud cry, 'Ho-lee cow!' thrills millions of Series listeners—and drives other millions up the wall—peels when it is hot, shags foul balls with his net and calls himself the last of the nonconformists
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October 07, 1968

Harry Has His Own Ways

Raucous, fun-loving St. Louis broadcaster Harry Caray, whose loud cry, 'Ho-lee cow!' thrills millions of Series listeners—and drives other millions up the wall—peels when it is hot, shags foul balls with his net and calls himself the last of the nonconformists

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During the 1964 season when Busch was thinking of replacing Manager Johnny Keane with Leo Durocher, it was Caray whom he ordered to make contact with Durocher, then a Dodger coach, and speed him quietly from a St. Louis hotel to Grant's Farm at an early-morning hour. And before Busch eventually gave the job to Red Schoendienst, it was Harry Caray whose opinion he sought. But Caray disclaims the role of court sage.

"I'm positive Gussie already had made up his mind about Schoendienst before he talked to me," he protests. "He asked me about Red at a party. Listen, I'd like to believe I've had something to do with some of these things but, honest to God, I haven't." Busch himself pinpoints exactly how much influence Caray has. "Not a damn bit," he specifies. If he were to consult Caray on a trade in the works, Busch adds, "Harry probably would blab the trade all over town."

At any rate, Caray contends that he has his hands full just trying to survive. "What play-by-play announcer do you know who criticizes players, who criticizes a trade?" he demands. "I like to think that if I've accomplished anything, well, I've tried to develop the feeling in the little man, the man we call the fan, that I have his interest at heart. In the baseball business I'm the last of the nonconformists. I feel that eventually, in this day and age, my kind of guy's gotta get fired."

Or perhaps confined to a padded cell. In Caray's scrapbook rest four lines of doggerel clipped from an unidentified newspaper, that say:

If you lack the tickets to see the Cards
You can listen in your own backyards,
And the greatest show, no ifs or buts,
Is to hear Harry Caray going nuts.

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