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The prof ducks a trap
Charles Goren
March 17, 1969
Exotic is the word for this hand, and it comes, aptly, from a far-off country, New Zealand. The bridge colony there is numerically small—recently a total of 57 tables was hailed as an excellent attendance for a three-session pairs event. Nevertheless, New Zealand proved that its players could hold then-own in top company when they were invited to the 1968 Australian Interstate Congress. The visitors finished second in the open teams and swept all three titles in the women's events, a fine showing when you recall that Australia won the 1968 Far Eastern Team Championship and very nearly scored the stunning upset of getting into the finals of the 1968 World Bridge Olympiad at Deauville, France.
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March 17, 1969

The Prof Ducks A Trap

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Exotic is the word for this hand, and it comes, aptly, from a far-off country, New Zealand. The bridge colony there is numerically small—recently a total of 57 tables was hailed as an excellent attendance for a three-session pairs event. Nevertheless, New Zealand proved that its players could hold then-own in top company when they were invited to the 1968 Australian Interstate Congress. The visitors finished second in the open teams and swept all three titles in the women's events, a fine showing when you recall that Australia won the 1968 Far Eastern Team Championship and very nearly scored the stunning upset of getting into the finals of the 1968 World Bridge Olympiad at Deauville, France.

The following deal, not from the tournament, was described by W. J. Hutchison in the New Zealand Bridge magazine. The hero is one "Professor Whip," whose skill you are invited to equal.

Although West's jump overcall was weak and tended to show nothing outside of a long suit, East's rescue was not as risky as it might seem. He reasoned that West must be short in hearts and could therefore be expected to furnish spade support. Primarily, East's aim was to lure the opponents into four hearts, and when this worked he pounced with glee.

East took the first two spades, and the professor's queen survived the third round of the suit. A diamond was led to dummy's queen and a heart returned. East elected to follow small and South's 9 won. The appearance of a club from West's hand caused at least one kibitzer to give up hope, but apparently it did not daunt the professor. He calmly continued by cashing the king of diamonds and leading a low club to dummy's jack. On the second trump lead, East once again refused to split his honors and South won with his 10.

When declarer went back to dummy with the diamond ace and led the 13th diamond, this was the position:

[4 of Hearts]
[4 of Diamonds]
[Ace of Clubs]
[5 of Clubs]

[King of Clubs]
[9 of Clubs]
[8 of Clubs]
[7 of Clubs]

[Ace of Hearts]
[Jack of Hearts]
[5 of Hearts]
[Queen of Clubs]

[7 of Spades]
[King of Hearts]
[Queen of Hearts]
[8 of Hearts]

East ruffed with an honor, and apparently that was the end of the matter. If South overruffed, he couldn't continue trumps without giving up two trump tricks. Neither could he lead a second club, as East would score his low trump by ruffing and win the setting trick with his remaining honor. When the professor went into a huddle, the kibitzer wondered how long it would take him to see that he was doomed. But the professor went right on thinking, and you are entitled to take as much time as he did.

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