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Herman Weiskopf
May 26, 1969
When the letters WP appeared in front of the name of John (Blue Moon) Odom in box scores in 1965, they usually stood for Wild Pitch. He led the Northwest League that season with 30 WPs. This year the letters WP have again showed up regularly next to Odom's name, but now they stand for Winning Pitcher. They have appeared seven times to be exact, and LP only once. Last week, the Oakland Athletics' righthander shut out Cleveland. Shutouts against the Indians have become something of a specialty with Odom, who takes particular delight in having blanked the team and its manager, Alvin Dark, four straight times in two years. Blue Moon has not forgotten the day in July of 1967 when Dark, then the manager of the A's, demoted him to Vancouver for a month. "That man never gave me a chance," Odom says. "Man, every time I make a good pitch or strike out a guy on his team I look right at him in the Cleveland dugout." When not too busy glaring at Dark, Odom supports his own cause by getting a few base hits at opportune moments. He offset his worst pitching of the season—four runs and nine walks in six innings against the Pilots—with his best hitting, slugging a three-run homer and three-run double as the Athletics won 11-7. Only 23 years old, Odom has already established himself as one of the finest young pitchers in the game. He gave up 2.45 runs a game last year to rank ninth best in the league He was the youngest among the top 28 pitchers from both leagues in that category and his 16 wins were by far the most for anyone close to his age. Odom's ERA currently is down to 2.32, disproving that old adage about the youth who sows wild pitches.
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May 26, 1969

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When the letters WP appeared in front of the name of John (Blue Moon) Odom in box scores in 1965, they usually stood for Wild Pitch. He led the Northwest League that season with 30 WPs. This year the letters WP have again showed up regularly next to Odom's name, but now they stand for Winning Pitcher. They have appeared seven times to be exact, and LP only once. Last week, the Oakland Athletics' righthander shut out Cleveland. Shutouts against the Indians have become something of a specialty with Odom, who takes particular delight in having blanked the team and its manager, Alvin Dark, four straight times in two years. Blue Moon has not forgotten the day in July of 1967 when Dark, then the manager of the A's, demoted him to Vancouver for a month. "That man never gave me a chance," Odom says. "Man, every time I make a good pitch or strike out a guy on his team I look right at him in the Cleveland dugout." When not too busy glaring at Dark, Odom supports his own cause by getting a few base hits at opportune moments. He offset his worst pitching of the season—four runs and nine walks in six innings against the Pilots—with his best hitting, slugging a three-run homer and three-run double as the Athletics won 11-7. Only 23 years old, Odom has already established himself as one of the finest young pitchers in the game. He gave up 2.45 runs a game last year to rank ninth best in the league He was the youngest among the top 28 pitchers from both leagues in that category and his 16 wins were by far the most for anyone close to his age. Odom's ERA currently is down to 2.32, disproving that old adage about the youth who sows wild pitches.

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