SI Vault
 
A roundup of the sports information of the week
June 23, 1969
BOATING—DON ARONOW of Coral Gables, Fla., former international ocean racing champion, won the $60,000 Bahamas 500 with The Cigarette, a 32-foot Cary Marine craft with Mercruiser power. Aronow, who narrowly beat Mel Riggs in Mona Lou, averaged nearly 65 mph for the 512 miles.
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June 23, 1969

A Roundup Of The Sports Information Of The Week

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BOATING—DON ARONOW of Coral Gables, Fla., former international ocean racing champion, won the $60,000 Bahamas 500 with The Cigarette, a 32-foot Cary Marine craft with Mercruiser power. Aronow, who narrowly beat Mel Riggs in Mona Lou, averaged nearly 65 mph for the 512 miles.

DOG SHOWS—CH. KISMET'S RED BARON, a 3-year-old Afghan hound, was judged best in show at the 35th annual North Shore Kennel Club event in Topsfield, Mass. It was the first victory for Red, owned by Mrs. Cheever Porter of New York and handled by Jane Forsythe.

GOLF—Muffin-faced ORVILLE MOODY, 35, of Killeen, Texas, a former GI and winner of Korean tournaments but never one in America, shot a steady last-round 72 to pluck the U.S. Open championship from a galaxy of wilting whizzes (page 18).

Defending British Amateur Champion MIKE BONALLACK of Thorpe Bay, England defeated Bill Hyndman, 53, of Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 3 and 2, at Hoylake. Bonallack, captain of England's Walker Cup team, is the first player since 1935 to win the title two consecutive years and the third to win four times.

Kathy Whitworth shot a one-under-par 72 in the final round of the $25,000 Patty Berg Classic at Sutton, Mass. to beat Sandra Haynie by one stroke with a 214. Miss Whitworth leads the women's tour in earnings with $22,775.

HARNESS RACING—NEVELE PRIDE ($2.40), driven by Stanley Dancer, trotted off with a $25,000 race named for his sire, Star's Pride, at Yonkers Raceway, N.Y. in 2:01.2.

HOCKEY—NHL: Convening in Montreal, the NHL reduced the maximum bend in the controversial curved stick but postponed hard decisions on future expansion, and in the annual draft did little to alter the status quo. The St. Louis Blues figured in some of the most active player movement, giving up the 1953 Rookie of the Year, little CAMILLE HENRY, 36, to the AHL's Buffalo Bisons in the "reverse" draft, and acquiring Center PHIL GOYETTE from New York. The Bisons also drafted Toronto's PIERRE PILOTE, 37, the NHL's top defenseman from 1962 to 1965 (at Chicago). The Black Hawks, who urgently need defensive help, picked up Goalie TONY ESPOSITO from Montreal. New York sold its iron man, Defenseman HARRY HOWELL, to Oakland and drafted tough-guy FORBES KENNEDY, the NHL's penalty leader, from Pittsburgh.

HORSE RACING—TELL ($5.40), ridden by Don Pierce, ran away from favored Jay Ray to take the $126,600 Hollywood Derby by 4� lengths, covering the 1�-mile in two minutes.

At Arlington Park in Chicago, favored PROMISE ($4.40), Bobby Ussery up, won the $55,200 Equipoise Mile—also by 4� lengths—over Info.

HORSE SHOWS—TOM GAYFORD won the first Grand Prix of North America in Toronto, leading CANADA to a sweep of the first four places.

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