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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
August 04, 1969
GOOD NEWSSirs:I read with great interest the short article, "A National Disgrace," in your SCORECARD section (July 7). I too have been dismayed at the way many U.S. basketball teams have been selected and have played in international competition. However, the "shoddy approach" you mentioned has not been true in the case of an NAIA all-star team, made up of players selected from small colleges, which recently returned from a 19-day tour of Czechoslovakia.
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August 04, 1969

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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For instance, by stating that he is "the second best hitter in the league," he clearly exaggerates his skills while ignoring the superior ones of several players on the Boston team he so painfully left. As a group, Messrs. Yastrzemski, Petrocelli, Smith and Conigliaro are averaging .290 with 21.5 home runs and 59.25 runs batted in apiece. The "second best hitter in the league," meanwhile, is sporting a .203 batting average with 18 home runs and 53 runs batted in (as of July 19).

What Ken Harrelson does best is to add color to the game at a time when it is in great need of personalities. Baseball's history is predominantly one of individual accomplishments and the lore surrounding those individuals. Ken represents an interesting page in this history. So, you handsome sonofagun, don't you ever die.
MARK L. O'CONNELL
Bladensburg, Md.

Sirs:
Hawk! Hawk! Hawk! That's how they cheer him now. Soon they will drop the letter "It."
M. J. RONBERG
Fort Wayne, Ind.

Sirs:
Although I do not doubt the validity of most of the Hawk's statements, I must disagree with one of them. He was not the most sought-after quarterback in the state of Georgia or even in Savannah. I was.
LARRY THOMPSON
Savannah

POACHED CATS
Sirs:
Congratulations on your article. Natural Enemy of Wild Cats (July 14). If women would confine themselves to wearing furs and leathers taken from animals raised for these purposes, the market for poached furs would disappear and the animals would have a chance to come back. The famous example, of course, is the saving of the egret.

I say bravo to Jacques Kaplan and I urge all women to follow his principles.
ELLEN F. SPALT
Plainfield, N.J.

Sirs:
Hooray for a long-overdue article! Not all women, however, are as vain as those you refer to in your article. Some still believe that leopard and cheetah skins look much better on their original and rightful owners. I'm one of them, and I'm not some old crone who's a nut about cats. I'm 33 and would look smashing in a leopard coat, except that I'd feel sick about wearing one.
MRS. VERNON B. GREER
Manhattan Beach, Calif.

WHITE MAN GO HOME
Sirs:
Re "War Canoes on the Moisie" (SCORECARD, July 14), there is a very simple solution to the problem of depletion of the Atlantic salmon in Canada's Moisie River, without resorting to a hitherto neglected law preventing the Montagnais Indians from netting them. Simply ban the sports fishermen. A good beginning place might be "the famous Moisie Salmon Club, owned by wealthy Americans."
JOHN JEROME
Franconia, N.H.

Sirs:
The only way to solve the problem is to allow only Montagnais to fish or net in the Moisie River. It seems that the Indians always had enough to eat until the invaders from Europe moved in. The white men, or I should say non-Indians, are the ones who should be arrested for fishing. After all, they are able to go to a store to buy the food which they can afford and the Indian very often cannot.
LUCY PIWOWARSKI
Nashua, N.H.

NEEDLES AND PILLS (CONT.)
Sirs:
I must disagree with one of your readers who says in a recent letter (19TH HOLE, July 14) that drugs are acceptable if they aid a runner's mental outlook, i.e., drugs designed to "mask [the] pain" in order for the athlete to compete closer to his physical peak.

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