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Peter Carry
August 25, 1969
Oriole righthander Jim Palmer is not even a college graduate, but he sounds like an orthopedist when he discusses arm, hip, back and shoulder injuries. Palmer blithely talks of infraspinatus muscles, Teflon needles, tendonitis and Indacin, because he has come to know them well. Since 1966, when he became the youngest player ever to pitch a World Series shutout, the 23-year-old fastballer has endured a series of injuries that knocked him out of the majors for almost two years. Even though the 6'3" 195-pounder was once considered the American League's most promising young pitcher, no one wanted him at the $25,000 waiver price last September, and Kansas City and Seattle passed him by in the expansion draft. The Orioles sent Palmer to pitch in Puerto Rico last winter, though, and with the help of an anti-inflammatory drug he returned to the Baltimore rotation this spring. He had a 9-2 record, when pop—his hip muscle separated. Palmer was on the disabled list 41 days before easing back into a starting spot. By last week he was blazing as he pitched his first big league no-hitter, an 8-0 win over the A's. Despite that performance and the league's best ERA (1.77), Palmer remains leery. "I'm reserved about success," he said. "I've had to come back about four or five times in the last two years because my arm's been hurt just about everywhere." If his latest revival is genuine, Baltimore should become even tougher. Led by Dave McNally (17-2), Mike Cuellar (16-9) and Tom Phoebus (12-4), its staff already tops the majors in ERA. Manager Earl Weaver's pitching is so solid he says his biggest worry is how to get enough work for tough long relievers Jim Hardin and Dave Leonhard.
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August 25, 1969

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Oriole righthander Jim Palmer is not even a college graduate, but he sounds like an orthopedist when he discusses arm, hip, back and shoulder injuries. Palmer blithely talks of infraspinatus muscles, Teflon needles, tendonitis and Indacin, because he has come to know them well. Since 1966, when he became the youngest player ever to pitch a World Series shutout, the 23-year-old fastballer has endured a series of injuries that knocked him out of the majors for almost two years. Even though the 6'3" 195-pounder was once considered the American League's most promising young pitcher, no one wanted him at the $25,000 waiver price last September, and Kansas City and Seattle passed him by in the expansion draft. The Orioles sent Palmer to pitch in Puerto Rico last winter, though, and with the help of an anti-inflammatory drug he returned to the Baltimore rotation this spring. He had a 9-2 record, when pop—his hip muscle separated. Palmer was on the disabled list 41 days before easing back into a starting spot. By last week he was blazing as he pitched his first big league no-hitter, an 8-0 win over the A's. Despite that performance and the league's best ERA (1.77), Palmer remains leery. "I'm reserved about success," he said. "I've had to come back about four or five times in the last two years because my arm's been hurt just about everywhere." If his latest revival is genuine, Baltimore should become even tougher. Led by Dave McNally (17-2), Mike Cuellar (16-9) and Tom Phoebus (12-4), its staff already tops the majors in ERA. Manager Earl Weaver's pitching is so solid he says his biggest worry is how to get enough work for tough long relievers Jim Hardin and Dave Leonhard.

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