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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
September 01, 1969
TIME TO REMEMBERSirs:Congratulations on your 15th anniversary. I missed only a few issues in that time (because of Vietnam), and I can truthfully say the Aug. 18 issue is one of your best.
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September 01, 1969

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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TIME TO REMEMBER
Sirs:
Congratulations on your 15th anniversary. I missed only a few issues in that time (because of Vietnam), and I can truthfully say the Aug. 18 issue is one of your best.

Although it took you 15 years, the story on Hank Aaron was richly rewarding to us (his tans). Hank was a rookie in 1954 and, true to form, Wally Moon was voted Rookie of the Year. Wally who? But Hank Aaron has survived and survived and survives.

Stay as you are, SI. May you never die!
STANLEY R. PETERSON
Soldiers Grove, Wis.

Sirs:
Was it coincidence that Henry Aaron of the Braves appeared on the cover of your anniversary issue? Those who saw your first issue back in 1954 will recall the cover photograph of County Stadium, the Braves' home in Milwaukee. It just brings to mind the dramatic changes that have taken place in baseball during the last 15 years. If change continues at the same pace, perhaps your 25th anniversary cover will again picture Henry Aaron—this time as the Braves' new manager, looking over his new ball park in Red Springs, N.C. (A Bonanza in Red Springs, July 28).
JIM ROEMER
Denver

Sirs:
As a fan and close follower of Hank Aaron ever since those early days in Milwaukee, I would like to express my pleasure at William Leggett's article, Hank Becomes a Hit. Back in the 1950s and early 1960s I was one of those kids Aaron talked about who read not only headlines, but also box scores. I have closely followed Aaron's march toward the top in hitting categories, and no one needs to tell me of his greatness I'm glad that the rest of the fans are recognizing it now. I know I will be celebrating next spring when Hank becomes the first player in history to get 3,000 hits, of which 500 or more will be homers.
ALAN KARNATH
Mosinee, Wis.

Sirs:
I have been an avid Brave fan since I was 6, and I have often wondered when Hammerin' Hank was going to get his long overdue recognition as being one of the greatest baseball players that ever lived.

Mr. Aaron has been playing baseball longer than I have been alive, and I hope he never stops. Thanks for a great story!
RICHARD P. TETU
Novato, Calif.

LOOKING AHEAD
Sirs:
Concerning your article Shy Owner of 1/640th of the U.S. (Aug. 18), could it be there are two gigantic Weyerhaeuser companies? The one we here in Seattle are familiar with is one of the largest, most blatant polluters of both air and water in the Puget Sound area. Possibly it is hard to see the benevolent, conservation-minded company through the cloud of haze from its poorly controlled smokestacks.
ROGER MINGO
Seattle

Sirs:
From one of those people who "will always want to get out in the woods," thanks for the article on George Weyerhaeuser. It is comforting to read of his contribution to conservation and recreation. I would rate him as being No. 1 on the Keep America Beautiful list.
TORSTEN K. SEUBOLD
Moline, Ill.

BOW AND ARROW
Sirs:
The Hardy BOY and His Bow and Arrow, by Herman Weiskopf (Aug. 11), is one of the most refreshing sports stories that I have read in your tine magazine. I am not an archery fan, but with this fine introduction I, as well as many others, would be interested in a feature article on an archery tournament.
GERALD E. RODGERS
New York City

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