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WHEN THE SAINTS GO STUMBLING OUT
Tex Maule
October 27, 1969
In sunny, windswept Tulane Stadium last Sunday, 80,636 hyperexcited New Orleanians howled, stomped, booed and occasionally cheered through 2� hours of what may be the country's best variety show. They saw a huge hot-air balloon, a thousand pigeons, five thousand red-and-white toy balloons and the Baltimore Colts go into orbit; and the only sour note was that their beloved Saints couldn't get off the ground and lost by a score of 30-10.
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October 27, 1969

When The Saints Go Stumbling Out

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Last Friday, several radio stations reported that Fears had been fired, prompting Mecom to issue a denial from his hospital bed. "I'm the owner and Fears is the coach, and I think he's a good one," he said. Mecom had been watching a housewife-oriented variety show on a color television set and seemed happy to be able to talk football. "I've made some mistakes as an owner and I guess I'll make some more," he continued. "But I stick by my people. I know Tom needs time."

After the game Mecom returned to the hospital. He has a million-dollar home in Houston and a pied-�-terre in New Orleans over the Saints" offices on St. Charles Avenue. This apartment is a modest affair of six bedrooms, a kitchen equipped to feed an army and a living room the size of a basketball court.

Mecom will miss the next two or three Saint games, and by the time he is released from the hospital his club may have won one. After all, four of their five losses have been to top contenders. Unfortunately, the Saints are in much the same shape as Rebel. They have unlimited courage and enthusiasm, but not enough teeth.

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