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Hey, that's Missouri and Oklahoma out there!
Roy Blount Jr.
November 03, 1969
If Colorado and Kansas State knew it, they didn't care as they squashed two Big Eight giants, threw the conference race into chaos and made the winner anyone's guess
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November 03, 1969

Hey, That's Missouri And Oklahoma Out There!

If Colorado and Kansas State knew it, they didn't care as they squashed two Big Eight giants, threw the conference race into chaos and made the winner anyone's guess

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Colorado, meanwhile, knew how it felt a year ago to get physically clobbered by Missouri in Columbia. The score didn't hurt so much. It was only 27-14. But the Tigers battered the Buffs around for a total of six concussions. Last week Bob Anderson, aided by a tough front four on defense, got revenge out in Boulder. Missouri could count about nine disabled Tigers as well as Colorado's 31 points when it was over.

There are several things to understand about Anderson. First, he was a rollout quarterback for two seasons (leading the Big Eight in total offense last year) and for the first two games of 1969. But then Coach Eddie Crowder secretly shifted him to tailback, believing Anderson might be all that Oklahoma's Steve Owens is. Perhaps Crowder is right. With the 132 yards he cranked out of Missouri, Anderson now has 704 yards for the year—71 more than Owens—and with his two touchdowns against Missouri he has just as many as the Sooner star (13), which makes them tied for the nation's scoring lead at 78 points, along with Jim Braxton of West Virginia. Anderson's two touchdowns also broke Whizzer White's career scoring total at Colorado, as if it hadn't been a tough enough year for the Supreme Court already.

Anderson is a strong ballcarrier, much on the order of Owens and almost as big at 208 and 6 feet. He bashes up and over tackles, drives by them and glances off defenders like a fish flipping out of a boat. He also dates a former pompon girl, has an older brother, Dick, who made All-America on defense for the Buffs two years ago, and is so intense a competitor that it was his idea, along with Colorado's other two captains, to lead the team in wind sprints in the end zone after every game—win or lose.

After the first few minutes there was little question about Missouri's fate at Boulder. Anderson's runs got his team off to a 10-0 lead, and when Missouri got back in the game on a 75-yard pass from erratic Terry McMillan to Mel Gray, the Buffs struck just as promptly. Paul Arendt, a substitute quarterback and another of those good sophomores who seem to be everywhere, passed 79 yards to Monte Huber to put the Buffs ahead by 17-7. When Missouri cut that margin, Colorado scored again behind Arendt. And when Missouri came back again, Colorado, with Anderson bolting over everyone, scored once more. It was such a delicious win that a little old lady greeted Anderson outside the dressing room with a homemade cake, presented it and said, "You've just done so much for me."

Apparently, one of the best decisions Crowder ever made at Colorado was to move Anderson to tailback. Anderson's throwing had never been quite satisfactory, but he was always a devastating runner. Crowder made the switch the week of the Indiana game in the most fascinating of ways. In workouts Anderson ran at tailback, but he wore another number. The quarterback, in turn, wore Anderson's number. This was just in case there were any spies peering down from the Flatirons, the mountain range that overlooks Colorado's scenic campus, a campus so noted for fun that coeds have been known to attend summer school there from the University of Hawaii, and so casual about recreation that a homecoming banner last week asked fans to PUT A TIGER IN YOUR PIPE.

It is no secret anymore that Bob Anderson is situated at running back or that Kansas State's Lynn Dickey is at least one-fourth of "super-super-super-super," so, regardless of what fans are smoking out in Boulder or Manhattan, the whole Big Eight is more than slightly on fire.

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