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THE TRADES BECALM SKINNY JACK
Mark Mulvoy
November 17, 1969
Nicklaus beat the wind on his record-breaking first round in the Hawaiian Open, but Bruce Crampton blew in from nowhere
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November 17, 1969

The Trades Becalm Skinny Jack

Nicklaus beat the wind on his record-breaking first round in the Hawaiian Open, but Bruce Crampton blew in from nowhere

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Still leading by four strokes, Nicklaus started Saturday playing the way he left off on Friday and immediately lost the lead to Tom Weiskopf. Then Weiskopf got into trouble, and Crampton, who was eight shots behind Nicklaus at the start of the round, took a temporary three-stroke lead with a strong seven-under-par 65. Eventually Nicklaus recovered from a 22-hole slump, during which he did not make a birdie and salvaged a lowly 74—his first over-par round in four tournaments—to close within one stroke of Crampton at the end of the day.

On Sunday Crampton came on even stronger, making birdies on the first two holes, while Nicklaus, playing in the group ahead, missed short birdie putts and had to settle for pars. This gave the little Australian a comfortable three-stroke lead, and he outplayed Nicklaus the rest of the round.

The best thing Bruce did all week, though, was keep his cool. For years he has been known as the mean man on the tour—rude with caddies, galleries, marshals and tournament officials. He still is not Mr. Congeniality, but last week, at least, Crampton had his mouth shut and his temper in control.

So Sunday night they gave Bruce his check for $25,000—enough money to keep him in mai tais, if not in a permanent good humor.

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