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THE BROOKLYN DELICATESSEN CAPER
Edwin Shrake
November 24, 1969
Getting rich on the races—a dream to so many—inspired the Fulton Street mob that stole $1.3 million in Aqueduct receipts
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November 24, 1969

The Brooklyn Delicatessen Caper

Getting rich on the races—a dream to so many—inspired the Fulton Street mob that stole $1.3 million in Aqueduct receipts

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"The bad thing about this Wells Fargo hijacking is that it will excite the cupidity of other stickup artists," Inspector Gleason said. "They've been doing jobs that if they hit it big they'd get $5,000. Now they see how to make a million. That's like showing honey to the bee." Usually a robbery of epic proportions has an insider among its plotters, someone to leave a door unlocked, an alarm unplugged or a confidence unconfidential. Inspector Gleason has put Kerrigan, Kateridge and Raftery through the lie detector routine, and all emerged with their stories verified. "I still can't totally discount the inside possibility, but at this point, to me, the guards just look stupid," said Gleason. "Of course, this job was well planned. The crux of the matter is to get inside the truck without getting shot by the guards. That takes a good deal of nerve."

Despite the testimony about the badly shaking pistol hand, the three bandits displayed admirable grit in marching up to the armored truck on a busy street and climbing right in. That is the sporting way. One of the outlaws even wore a blue baseball cap. Now if they can avoid being betrayed for the $125,000 reward, can resist the lush life for a while and can keep their mouths shut around their girl friends, they will be remembered forever, with a sneaking fondness, as three who beat the races.

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