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SKY-HIGH STAKES ON LONDON BRIDGE
Victor Mollo
January 26, 1970
The play of a single card could win or lose as much as $5,000 for Omar Sharif's Circus and the English experts
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January 26, 1970

Sky-high Stakes On London Bridge

The play of a single card could win or lose as much as $5,000 for Omar Sharif's Circus and the English experts

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EAST

[Ace of Spades]
[King of Spades]
[10 of Spades]
[8 of Spades]
[Jack of Hearts]
[10 of Hearts]
[3 of Hearts]
[King of Diamonds]
[8 of Diamonds]
[9 of Clubs]
[8 of Clubs]
[7 of Clubs]
[6 of Clubs]

That the great should err and be seen erring is forever a comfort for lesser mortals, and the audience chuckled when Garozzo and Belladonna, perhaps the two greatest players in the world, once stumbled into a slam, missing two aces. But lapses were few, and many a time the artistry of players on both sides was loudly applauded. After 40 rubbers, the halfway stage, the Circus was leading by 5,340. They added 2,000 more, lost that and gained a mere 130 over the last half of the match. All in all, the Circus held a few more aces and slam hands than their opponents, but in high-card points the British had a slight advantage, less than half of one percent.

As Omar's guest at a victory celebration, my last impressions were of champagne and spaghetti at 5 a.m., with Omar caricaturing the mannerisms of Claude Delmouly so perfectly that I realized Omar the bridge champion would never cease to be Omar the actor.

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