SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
February 09, 1970
HARRIED HEIDISirs:I have just finished reading William Johnson's five-part article on television and sport (Dec. 22 et seq.). I think that most people will tell you that network television has done more bad than good. First of all, television has helped inflation with its high rates for commercials. Two hundred thousand dollars for a one-minute Super Bowl commercial? Ridiculous! Luckily the networks have not yet affected basketball and hockey too much, and let's hope they don't or we may really see sponsors' prices take their toll in the stores.HUBERT ALLEN Jersey City, N.J.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
February 09, 1970

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

HARRIED HEIDI
Sirs:
I have just finished reading William Johnson's five-part article on television and sport (Dec. 22 et seq.). I think that most people will tell you that network television has done more bad than good. First of all, television has helped inflation with its high rates for commercials. Two hundred thousand dollars for a one-minute Super Bowl commercial? Ridiculous! Luckily the networks have not yet affected basketball and hockey too much, and let's hope they don't or we may really see sponsors' prices take their toll in the stores.
HUBERT ALLEN
Jersey City, N.J.

Sirs:
I would like to make a comment on WFIL-TV Producer Leonard Levin's letter (19TH HOLE, Jan. 26). He asks you to compare the 12�% of total TV football game time spent on commercials with the percentage of advertising copy in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. He seems not to realize that a reader can turn the page and proceed immediately to the next article if he so desires.
CHARLES L. LERMAN
Cambridge, Mass.

Sirs:
William Johnson's account of NBC's foul-up in the Heidi affair leaves out an interesting sidelight. During the showing of Heidi, which I sat and watched in something of a state of shock, NBC ran occasional banners across the screen informing viewers of the outcome of the Raider-Jet game (not during any commercials, of course). One of these occurred at the climactic moment when the little girl steps out of her wheelchair and walks. So NBC not only loused up the football game but effectively ruined the climax of Heidi as well!
MICHAEL A. NORELL
Addison, Texas

ROYAL FORTUNE
Sirs:
Bob Cousy was unquestionably one of basketball's most outstanding players, but is his coaching skill really that commendable (Cousy Makes the Royals Run, Jan. 26)? His various fines and his team-unity doctrine are certainly steps in the right direction. But what about that all-important cynosure of any pro team, the won-lost record? No one can ignore the fact that this year's record is still below last season's mediocre .500 mark. Royal supporters place considerable blame on injuries, but teams with better records have had the same problem. Indeed, future years may bring Royal fortune, but let's tell the success stories after they've been lived.
DALE REHRER
Reading, Pa.

Sirs:
William Leggett's article on the revamped Cincinnati Royals was interesting to be sure. I wonder, though, if upheaval for upheaval's sake, without evident positive results, merits cover-story reporting in lieu of more vibrant tales lurking within the pro basketball lair. Royal-style ball still produces fewer wins than losses, still draws pathetic "crowds" and has hardly stirred the blood of enthusiasts around the circuit.

One more thing. If, as Leggett suggests, Cousy stepped out onto Wisconsin Avenue from the Milwaukee Arena's rear door, I cannot appreciate that erstwhile coach's respect for Lew Alcindor. Any man capable of gobbling up three city blocks with a single step couldn't possibly stand in awe of a mere 7-footer. That "heavy rear door" is on State Street!
TOM SWENSON
Milwaukee

? Bob Cousy, take one giant step.—ED.

MORMON ISSUE
Sirs:
It thrilled me to read an unbiased account of the Brigham Young University situation (The Other Side of "The Y," Jan. 26). And so very fair of you to interview in depth only non-Mormons! Remember that terrible old "joke" about the Southern colonel who said, "Suh, I'm agin' only three things: ignorance, prejudice and Neeegroes"? The new version has a clench-fisted black say, "Man, I put down just three things: ignorance, prejudice and honkie Mormons."

Either way, it's not funny. Or are ignorance and prejudice kosher now—just as long as they are only directed toward certain groups?
L. C. MILNE
Sierra Madre, Calif.

Sirs:
William F. Reed states that "the doctrine that men with black skin are not qualified to enter the church's priesthood was incorporated in the writings of Prophet-Founder Joseph Smith." He further states that "polygamy was once a pillar of Joseph Smith's theological structure." It should be noted that the revelation on polygamy was not presented to the Mormon Church until 1852, eight years after the death of Joseph Smith. Anyone who has studied the history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints can plainly see that such doctrine was not consistent with the beliefs and practices of Joseph Smith or the church during his lifetime.

Continue Story
1 2 3