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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
August 17, 1970
RAINDROPS ON HIS HEADSirs:I was under the impression that Don't Drink the Water was the title of a play, but after reading your Aug. 3 article on the U.S.U.S.S.R. track meet I suspect that this catchy little phrase is the title of the opening chapter of a new tearjerking novel called Putnam's Complaint. Pat blamed everything but the weather for the U.S. defeat (on second thought, he did say, "It rained a lot"). I felt embarrassed that Mr. Putnam felt it necessary to highlight a bunch of petty grievances as a means of accounting for America's poor showing. By all means, don't drink the water—but don't soak it up with a crying towel either.MARK R. KOWLER Milwaukee
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August 17, 1970

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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RAINDROPS ON HIS HEAD
Sirs:
I was under the impression that Don't Drink the Water was the title of a play, but after reading your Aug. 3 article on the U.S. U.S.S.R. track meet I suspect that this catchy little phrase is the title of the opening chapter of a new tearjerking novel called Putnam's Complaint. Pat blamed everything but the weather for the U.S. defeat (on second thought, he did say, "It rained a lot"). I felt embarrassed that Mr. Putnam felt it necessary to highlight a bunch of petty grievances as a means of accounting for America's poor showing. By all means, don't drink the water—but don't soak it up with a crying towel either.
MARK R. KOWLER
Milwaukee

Sirs:
I must protest your publication of such hopelessly biased articles. Quite apart from its whining tenor, the article contains statements that are manifestly untrue, such as that Borzov had a false start in the 100 meters and was ahead at one stage "by seven yards"! Putnam is evidently unaware that millions of Americans saw this race on TV not only live but repeated in slow motion. The start seemed perfectly fair, and Borzov was never ahead by more than two yards. Is it any wonder that Americans are so often called the world's worst losers?
ROBERT J. MARSHALL, M.D.
Morgantown, W. Va.

Sirs:
The acerbic comments of Writer Pat Putnam as well as those attributed to the athletes hardly match your Aug. 3 cover, which seems to depict camaraderie between U.S. and Russian athletes.
FREDERICK H. HART
La Mesa, Calif.

Sirs:
After seeing the meet on television I thoroughly appreciate your efforts to discuss the problems our athletes had during their stay in Russia.
TOM LOHR
Lackawanna, N.Y.

Sirs:
Face it, the U.S. track team just wasn't as good as the Russians"!
DOUGLAS LEACH
Philadelphia

TEARS OF THREE CITIES
Sirs:
It was with much dismay that I read your lead item in SCORECARD (Aug. 3) regarding the doomed dome for Erie County. As a transplanted Buffalonian, I am an avid follower of the football Bills. Now, with nothing to fall back on but antiquated War Memorial Stadium, the chances for the team's remaining in Buffalo are virtually nil.

You state that "except for Dallas, Buffalo is the largest city in the country without a major league baseball team." You fail to mention the fact that the city's International League franchise was moved to Winnipeg for lack of support, thereby making Buffalo the No. 1 city in the nation without a professional baseball team of any sort.
DONALD W. KRONENTHAL
Mamaroneck, N.Y.

Sirs:
Indianapolis, which now ranks 12th (ahead of Buffalo) in central-city population, is without a major league baseball or football team. Move over, Buffalo, you're not the only one crying!
TONY HARRELSON
Indianapolis

Sirs:
Poor Buffalo. Poor Dallas. They have no major league baseball teams. Now consider Columbus, Ohio. It is without any major pro sport. Worse yet, it has absolutely no prospects. What makes the situation ludicrous is the large stadium that has remained unavailable. The Cincinnati Bengals might have been the Columbus Bengals if Ohio Stadium could have been used. But the Big Ten has had a rather silly rule against pro teams using its sacred sports plants.

Despite continuous capacity crowds for Ohio State football games, the one million people of the Columbus area have outgrown college-town ties. They deserve better, and that means pro sports.
JOHN LAWRENCE
Columbus, Ohio

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