SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
November 09, 1970
TOXIC POLLUTANTSSirs:It was past time for SI to step forward with its article Poison Roams Our Coastal Seas (Oct. 26). The deadly pollution that is wreaking havoc on our coastal waters and their inhabitants comes almost exclusively from economic ventures, whether they be industrial plants or farmers taking care of their crops. As we all know, it is difficult to appeal to someone when his pocketbook is at stake. Only with the help of the molders of public opinion, such as magazines like SI, can we have an effective response to this tragic situation.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 09, 1970

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

TOXIC POLLUTANTS
Sirs:
It was past time for SI to step forward with its article Poison Roams Our Coastal Seas (Oct. 26). The deadly pollution that is wreaking havoc on our coastal waters and their inhabitants comes almost exclusively from economic ventures, whether they be industrial plants or farmers taking care of their crops. As we all know, it is difficult to appeal to someone when his pocketbook is at stake. Only with the help of the molders of public opinion, such as magazines like SI, can we have an effective response to this tragic situation.

Two basic problems are involved in the caretaking of our coastal waters. The first is their salvation. The second is the preservation of the creatures that inhabit them. Tons of seafood are taken each year from our estuaries, bays and other coastal areas. It is evident that we are daily reducing the amount of edible seafood in these waters. Should the reproduction of these creatures now be made impossible by toxic pollutants because of our carelessness and stupidity this seafood could be lost forever.

My sincere thanks for your article.
TOM BEASLEY
Austin, Texas

Sirs:
The presentation of clear, candid, well-documented articles such as those that have appeared in your magazine will hopefully open more eyes to the unchecked damage to our natural surroundings.

It is perhaps significant to note that most people in this country still look upon pollution as simply an unfortunate annoyance and not as an imminent threat to all life on this planet. If our elected officials and government agencies are ever to act meaningfully on behalf of our environment, it must be in response to a feeling of urgency generated by an enlightened populace.
MARK RABIN
Freeport, N.Y.

Sirs:
Thank you, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. As a graduate student in chemistry I appreciate not only your interest in publicizing ecological problems, but also your having funded a study. Until more nongovernment groups are willing to spend money to find out what is wrong with our environment and to publicize their findings, little will be done to eliminate the causes of pollution.
GEORGIA WEINSTEIN
Cambridge, Mass.

Sirs:
Like Dr. Robert F. Smolker, State University of New York ecologist, I am horrified by some of the data you have published. As an ardent fisherman I congratulate Robert H. Boyle et al But there is more the public can do. It can and should demand that the use of these harmful and persistent chemicals be halted—now.
JOSEPH F. JENNINGS
Miami

SEASON OPENERS
Sirs:
Congratulations on your preview of pro basketball's 25th season (Oct. 26). It was all very good, except for the remarks you made about Jim Barnett and the Portland Trailblazers. Barnett must have turned from an All-Flake into an All-Great, because he averaged 20.9 points (with rookie Geoff Petrie close behind) during the preseason play.
KENT WESTPHAL
Salem, Ore.

Sirs:
I cannot see how you can predict that Milwaukee will run away with it in the NBA's Midwestern Division. Milwaukee has the edge, but Detroit isn't far behind.
RICH ODDO
Middletown, N.J.

Sirs:
Milwaukee's Big O is not big enough to handle the Knicks.
ROSS GITTELL
Forest Hills, N.Y.

Continue Story
1 2