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NO PRACTICE MAKES ALMOST PERFECT
Pat Putnam
February 08, 1971
Randy Matson has had no peer in the shotput, but his dominion is threatened by Al Feuerbach, who throws only when it counts
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February 08, 1971

No Practice Makes Almost Perfect

Randy Matson has had no peer in the shotput, but his dominion is threatened by Al Feuerbach, who throws only when it counts

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Later, in a small room away from the main arena, Feuerbach dissected his defeat and found hope. "I was ready mentally," he said, "but physically I wasn't quite alert. But that 67'8" throw, that was so easy. And I got no explosion into it. I'm not happy with losing, but now I'm more optimistic than ever. If I can throw that lousy and do that well, why even right now I must have another two feet in me. Next week Randy and I go at it again in Fort Worth. I told him it ought to be a good one. He just grinned and said he'd be ready. Well, he's beaten me three out of four. Maybe I better reevaluate my training." He paused. "Maybe I better throw the shot in practice next week. Then, maybe I shouldn't."

Outside, the crowd roared once more. Steve Prefontaine, the University of Oregon's 20-year-old middle-distance sensation, who had won the two-mile in 8:31.6, a meet record, had been named the evening's top performer.

"Aw, I would have voted for Randy," said Feuerbach.

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