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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
May 24, 1971
UNHAPPYSirs:Please explain to your readers that the headlines for the Chandler stories were yours not mine (How I Jumped from Clean Politics into Dirty Baseball, April 26 and May 3).
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May 24, 1971

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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Sirs:
The Bucks must really have it made. They're getting the same treatment the Packers and Lombardi got! I note such adjectives as "unemotional, colorless, humorless and businesslike." Your green eyes are showing.
PAT VANDENBUSH
Green Bay

BRIGHT STARS
Sirs:
Congratulations to Mark Mulvoy for his fine article (North Stars Are the Greatest, May 10). It goes to show that the expansion of hockey is working in some cities. Minnesota has a fine team and tremendous fans. Even though they lost, the North Stars have proven something to the more established NHL teams, especially the Canadiens.
JEFFREY SENNOTT
Newton, Mass.

BIG-GAME HUNTER
Sirs:
Unfortunately, another article has been printed that helps to destroy the already distorted image of the big-game hunter as the dedicated and hardworking sportsman that he really is.

Perhaps I read your article (On the Horns of a Dilemma, April 26) out of context, but I got the impression that most hunters will lie and cheat to win a trophy. I also got the impression that most trophies are given just for the sake of publicity. Perhaps this is true of the companies that award them, but as the only hunter to win all three of the awards mentioned—Weatherby, Air France and Winchester Shikar-Safari—I would like to say that it takes a bit more than strolling down Madison Avenue to win them, and the competition is as fierce as in any other sport. Also, there are no secrets in the big-game hunting world. When a man cheats and buys a set of horns, it becomes quickly known by those who are interested.

The Weatherby award is given for lifetime achievements, i.e., rare animals, most species of animals taken, most countries hunted and best trophies taken. The Air France award was given to me for taking the largest elephant (the tusks weighed 118 and 108 pounds) and the largest Cape buffalo (50�-inch spread) in Africa in a single year, 1967. The Winchester Shikar-Safari award is given for the best animal taken in Asia in a single year. I won it with an Ovis ammon ram with a 67-inch horn, breaking a record of 70 years. Incidentally, I almost lost my life on this hunt. I was in a hospital for five days recovering.

Someday, sometime, I hope that a magazine will have the guts to print the true story of what it takes to be a great trophy hunter. You cannot sit on your duff and win major trophies in the hunting world anymore than you can in other sports. In pursuing my sport, I have worked hard under all kinds of conditions—rain, sleet, snow, desert heat of 130� and freezing temperatures down to 50� below zero. One must be prepared to hunt at altitudes of over 15,000 feet and in hot, stinking jungles so thick you wouldn't believe it. We don't have air-conditioned stadiums to work in. I know, I was there.
C. J. McELROY
Inglewood, Calif.

BOWLING'S ANSWER
Sirs:
Kim Chapin's article Obviously Ws a Leftist Plot (May 3) was extremely well written, and it is obvious that he did his homework. I am pleased to report, however, that we have found a way to fill the right-side track in the lanes in a manner that gives the right-handed bowler a fairly equal opportunity to compete against the lefthander.

In any sport, however, the cream usually rises to the top because of an ability to adjust to changing rules, conditions and equipment. I can't see where bowling is any different.
EDDIE ELIAS
Founder and Legal Counsel
Professional Bowlers Association
Akron

WHIZ KIDS
Sirs:
It's not so bad when items appear in FACES IN THE CROWD about my peers (11-, 12- and 13-year-olds) trying to distance-run. But the article on Kevin Knox (Whoosh Goes the Wasco Whiz, May 3) is going too far. There are many, many young runners who can beat Knox hands down. Moreover, I am one of them. This sounds cocky, but it is probably true.

Still, I am happy that SI is recognizing the ability of young people. Maybe you will lead the way in breaking the segregation at the Boston Marathon, where young people are not allowed to compete.
STEPHEN ANTONAKOS
New York City

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