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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
May 24, 1971
UNHAPPYSirs:Please explain to your readers that the headlines for the Chandler stories were yours not mine (How I Jumped from Clean Politics into Dirty Baseball, April 26 and May 3).
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May 24, 1971

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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UNHAPPY
Sirs:
Please explain to your readers that the headlines for the Chandler stories were yours not mine (How I Jumped from Clean Politics into Dirty Baseball, April 26 and May 3).

I had no opportunity to either approve or disapprove the headlines. I regret that the words "dirty baseball" were used. I am not, after almost 20 years (your CONTENTS billing, April 19), "still seething."
ALBERT B. CHANDLER
Versailles, Ky.

DAVE HILL
Sirs:
Myron Cope's article on Dave Hill was super (Often Bloody, but Uncowed, May 10)! A man like Hill who stands up to the USGA and PGA officials (who obviously have something against him) deserves recognition. This so-called bad guy of golf has gotten me very much interested in the game. And, by the way, I've never played golf in my life!
GREG STEERE
Salisbury, Md.

Sirs:
Simply put, Dave Hill seems to like the courses he wins on and dislike the ones he loses on. My 4-year-old has the same attitude toward life, but I hope that before he's 10 I can teach him to admit his own shortcomings rather than blaming the world for them. I'm bored with spoiled brats of all ages.
JOHN W. BARKER
West Palm Beach, Fla.

Sirs:
We Michiganders seem to have cornered the market in hotheaded professional athletes. Even your article on native son Dave Hill made a passing reference to Alex Karras, another outspoken, but rarely soft-spoken, player in our state. The Red Wings have been idle in recent years, but they once gave Howie Young a base of operations. And who can forget Denny McLain?

Of course, the facts that Karras was one of the best football players at any position for years, that McLain had the first 30-win season in 34 years and that Hill's accomplishments put him in the front rank are some consolation to a state whose four big-league sports teams have managed about two national championships in the last decade. Now if the Red Wings can just trade one of their Joe Nobodies for Derek Sanderson....
JOHN AUGUSTINE
Essexville, Mich.

THE GREENING OF A DYNASTY
Sirs:
After studying the last paragraph of your article on the NBA champion Bucks (Hey, Look, Ma! Only One Hand, May 10), I came to the conclusion that the only way to win consistently in basketball is to wear a green uniform. Boston won 11 titles in 13 years in Celtic green. The Bucks have now won in a bit darker shade, and it would appear that they will be on top for a few years to come. If any doubters should point out that UCLA won five NCAA championships in a row and seven in the past eight years in blue and yellow, just ask any elementary school child what color results from the mixing of those two colors.
BRUCE DELAHORNE
Tulsa

Sirs:
Your story implies that the Bucks will create a dynasty like the Celtics did. I disagree with you. The Celtics' green is theirs and no one else's. Last year New York showed the country that Lew could not do it all by himself. Now the Bucks have Oscar. He will be 33 years old this November.
PAUL HEANUE
Boston

Sirs:
There may have been Celtic green dominating the Milwaukee scene this year, but next year the Bucks' color will be bloodshot red when a healthy Willis Reed and the New York Knickerbockers converge on the scene. Lew Alcindor may very well be the best big man in pro ball, and Oscar Robertson is never less than sensational, but it takes more than two men to win games. Don't forget that the Knickerbockers defeated Milwaukee four out of five times during the season.

Yes, a dynasty is in the making in the NBA, but its color is Knickerbocker blue.
STEVE KOFFLER
West Lafayette, Ind.

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