SI Vault
 
THE MELLOW VOICES OF OLD
Jerry Kirshenbaum
September 13, 1971
Pittsburgh's Rosey Rowswell (far left) said, "Open the window, Aunt Minnie," and became famous. Arch McDonald, the voice of the Senators, parted his hair in the middle and offered to fight fans. Cleveland Indian Jack Graney was the first ballplayer to turn announcer, to which the Yanks' Mel Allen would have said, "How about that?" Graham McNamee, here with John McGraw, was the first to broadcast baseball. The first to report Bobby Thomson's home run were Russ Hodges and Red Barber sitting in "the catbird seat."
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September 13, 1971

The Mellow Voices Of Old

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Pittsburgh's Rosey Rowswell (far left) said, "Open the window, Aunt Minnie," and became famous. Arch McDonald, the voice of the Senators, parted his hair in the middle and offered to fight fans. Cleveland Indian Jack Graney was the first ballplayer to turn announcer, to which the Yanks' Mel Allen would have said, "How about that?" Graham McNamee, here with John McGraw, was the first to broadcast baseball. The first to report Bobby Thomson's home run were Russ Hodges and Red Barber sitting in "the catbird seat."

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